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Cindy Sridharan
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Cindy Sridharan 4h
Replying to @shanselman
💙💙
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Cindy Sridharan 5h
Replying to @ssougou @cncf
Oh this is new to me! Will read it for sure - thanks for pointing this out.
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Cindy Sridharan 6h
Replying to @copyconstruct
Thinking about state is hard. Testing state is harder. Writing about state is the hardest. Don’t deal with state, make it someone else’s problem ... is probably the moral of the lesson here. ☹️
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Cindy Sridharan Sep 19
Replying to @AaronBBrown777
I guess i need to add the disclaimer here - I’m in no way affiliated with this store, don’t know the owners etc. I just happened to stumble upon this by accident.
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Cindy Sridharan Sep 19
Replying to @paul_rietschka
Yeah, I do wear a neck gaiter when I go running. I’ve heard it’s not quite as “safe” as a surgical mask, but it is the only one I can exercise in.
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Cindy Sridharan Sep 19
One thing I wish I’d done 6 months earlier was get a good, comfortable mask. Got these on Etsy and I hadn’t realized before now that wearing a mask didn’t have to be ... an absolute miserable experience. It makes such a difference when I spend so much of my time wearing a mask.
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Cindy Sridharan retweeted
Colm MacCárthaigh 29 Oct 18
Ok. tweet thread time! Too long ago I promised to write a screed explaining how much I hated mutual-auth TLS and why. I got distracted, and I wasn't happy with the writing, so here it is in tweet thread form instead! But basically: Client certs and Mutual-Auth TLS is TERRIBAD.
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Cindy Sridharan Sep 17
Replying to @copyconstruct
It’s not a book on “design patterns” but a book on software design. One that’ll make you really think, even if you don’t agree with everything
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Cindy Sridharan Sep 17
So ’s book on software design is one of the best I’ve read on this topic. I’ve tweeted about why I like the book several times before: 👇
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Cindy Sridharan Sep 17
Replying to @jckarter
Maybe we should all just stick to C, eh?
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Cindy Sridharan Sep 17
OK, wanted to make a proper apology. I shouldn’t have used the word Boomer in my previous tweet (I did it because Uncle Bob was harassing a woman who called him that, so I felt extra angry at him. Still doesn’t make it OK). I’m sorry for the use of the word. 😞
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Cindy Sridharan Sep 17
Replying to @hillelogram
Yeah, I found it super hard to concretize when I read it as an undergrad, and pretty irrelevant by the time I was a grad student. In all my years in industry, it never occurred to me that I should revisit the book. Instead, it was the ousterhout book that I related to the most.
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Cindy Sridharan Sep 17
Replying to @Grady_Booch @broady
IME, engineers not being familiar with design patterns has never been a major cause of concern. Instead, not knowing how to debug systems effectively, not knowing how to operate systems, not knowing how to encode resilience in code ... these have been far bigger problems.
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Cindy Sridharan Sep 17
Replying to @Grady_Booch @broady
Software written in more “modern” languages. Also mostly server side software that are mostly small and self contained code bases (I’ve never worked on something like MS Word or a text editor, examples which the GoF book used).
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Cindy Sridharan Sep 17
Replying to @Grady_Booch
Touche. I see your point and see how it was in bad taste. No excuses here. :)
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Cindy Sridharan Sep 17
Replying to @jjirsa
Condolences.
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Cindy Sridharan Sep 17
Replying to @taotetek
It is though. I found the food incredibly hard to read, both as an undergrad and as a grad student. Now as a professional engineer, I find it all the more irrelevant, especially when languages have evolved so much these days.
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Cindy Sridharan Sep 17
Replying to @broady @Grady_Booch
I did use the word “mostly”. For the most part, I don’t see many of these design patterns being particularly relevant to the types of software I build today. Some still has value (composition over inheritance, for instance).
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Cindy Sridharan Sep 17
Replying to @copyconstruct
I’m not dunking on the GoF book without having read it. I tried reading it twice. Once in college in 2010, once in 2014. I always keep notes of stuff I read. When I say it’s the Atlas Shrugged of tech books, I mean it. It is impenetrable. Poorest ROI on any book I’ve read.
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Cindy Sridharan Sep 17
Design Patterns as evangelized by Boomer programmers are mostly dead though. No tech interview screens for it. When was the last time the “flyweight pattern” came up in a code review? The Gang of Four book isn’t even *readable* ffs. It’s the Atlas Shrugged of tech books.
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