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Brendan Connors
population ecology | salmon | fisheries | research biologist | tweets my own
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Brendan Connors retweeted
Julie Charbonneau Jun 29
First chapter of thesis is out! We examine changes in monkfish size structure over the last half-century. // Le premier chapitre de ma thèse a été publié! La longueur moyenne de baudroies a été examinée au cours de 55 ans.
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Stephanie Peacock Jun 26
Congratulations ! Well deserved. (Good luck with that light board. 😊)
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Salmon Network Jun 25
Check out our new Science Spotlight, out on our website now! We're highlighting work by and colleagues from on one of the largest subsistence fisheries in the world
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Jan Ohlberger Jun 11
New paper in investigating consequences of shifts in population age and size structure for reproductive potential in Chinook salmon: With colleagues at , , , , ADFG, AYK-SSI
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Canadian Science Publishing May 30
New in finds the magnitude and direction of climate and competition effects on sockeye populations vary over large spatial scales 🐟 by et al.
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Brendan Connors May 29
Replying to @nceas @SterlingEyford
you might be interested in this.
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NCEAS May 28
How does a warming and more crowded ocean affect salmon across their range? Find out in a new paper led by and our working group!
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YSSC May 26
Yukon River hot water is affecting our Chinook. The temperature on the Alaskan side reached 21C last year and likely resulted in both enroute and prespawn mortality.
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Brendan Connors May 26
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Ben Sutherland May 25
Curious as to people's thoughts on a co-authorship question (pls RT!) : I remember reading a tweet a while ago that was from a that was saying he was disappointed to not receive authorship for projects, b/c he worked at a facility... (1/6)
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Brendan Connors May 26
Replying to @bsuther7
In my world (ecology/fisheries) usually is meeting at least 3 of: (1) conception or design, (2) securing funding, (3) data collection or processing, (4) analysis and interpretation, (5) contributions to writing; but prefer to err on side of inclusivity, key is to discuss up front
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Neil Gilbert May 18
👀 "...normal priors with very large variances on partial regression coefficients in logit-linear models likely do not achieve the shape intended by the practitioner on the probability scale"
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Brendan Connors May 25
Replying to @pete_rand @nceas and 4 others
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Brendan Connors May 25
Replying to @connorsbm
Industrial scale hatchery production occurs with minimal consideration for negative effects on distant populations. Our findings highlight the need for international cooperation to consider constraining the number of hatchery salmon released into the ocean.
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Brendan Connors May 25
Replying to @connorsbm
We show: a warming ocean and increasing salmon competitors reduces sockeye survival in southern part of range (eg ), but that in the north (eg ) warming ocean improves survival and offsets negative effects of competition among salmon at sea.
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Brendan Connors May 25
The ocean is getting warmer and more crowded, in part due to hatchery production. How does this affect salmon across their range? New paper with et al. reveals spatially dependent effects of climate and competition on sockeye.
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JAppliedEcology May 24
How to cost-effectively recover in Canada? et al. using Indigenous knowledge to identify which conservation actions are needed
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Tara Martin May 23
'Proactively safeguarding salmon habitat by limiting industrial development in critical areas is more cost-effective than restoring habitat after it becomes degraded'
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Watershed Watch Salmon Society May 22
Check this out! A new study indicates the best approach for investing in salmon recovery on the Central Coast of BC is: 1. watershed protection 2. stream Restoration and 3. removing barriers to fish migration
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Salmon Network May 21
Using Priority Threat Management, decision-making can incorporate the perspectives + knowledge of Indigenous peoples and other scientific experts to prioritize conservation strategies for Pacific conservation units of BC's Central Coast
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