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Brett Bartholomew
Coach, Best-Selling Author of "Conscious Coaching” & Keynote Speaker. I help others solve people problems that impede performance.
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Brett Bartholomew 17h
On the road again! It’s that time of year where I constantly learn more and more about my deficiencies as a communicator, and try to find more creative solutions to improve how I get my message across. At this…
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Brett Bartholomew Sep 13
One of the things I have to remind myself of daily. True “bang for your buck” comes from steady daily bricklaying, as opposed to a mythical overnight “a-ha” moment. How often do you get to the end of the week,…
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Brett Bartholomew Sep 11
Replying to @rhowson81 @AlanSteinJr
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Brett Bartholomew Sep 11
Replying to @rhowson81 @AlanSteinJr
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Brett Bartholomew Sep 11
Replying to @rhowson81 @AlanSteinJr
Hey Roger! This is a great question, but not one that can be quickly and cogently discussed on a medium like Twitter with limited characters. I’d recommend checking these resources and videos out for more context and examples:
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Brett Bartholomew Sep 11
Replying to @Coach_BrettB
Coaches have to embrace this and also learn how to laugh a little bit. Feedback is contextual, it’s not a death sentence. High correlation between ego and defensiveness. Quit worrying about what’s “reality in your setting” and focus on what’s possible in general.
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Brett Bartholomew Sep 11
Replying to @Coach_BrettB
An additional point- some get angry if someone in the group “less experienced” than them scores them poorly on a certain domain, yet they often don’t realize this person may represent the perception of an athlete or individual with less subject matter knowledge.
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Brett Bartholomew Sep 11
Replying to @Coach_BrettB
Something we’ve been doing more and more at AOC clinics and it’s always a lot of fun. Of course some get defensive when they receive feedback they don’t want to hear but the joy is recognizing that no coach is ever “perfect.”
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Brett Bartholomew Sep 11
Coaches of all types should crave (and enjoy) feedback. It doesn’t need to be complicated. Find ways to create constraint based scenarios where coaches have to “struggle” their way through certain scenarios and use video reviews along with self and peer evaluations.
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Brett Bartholomew Sep 9
Replying to @MaiTrainer
And YOU just made my day! Thank you for the kindness and support. Have a great week.
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Brett Bartholomew Sep 9
Replying to @TheRealConehead
Not sure what is better, this or your new profile pic.
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Brett Bartholomew Sep 9
Replying to @USCBSportsMed
Thank you for sharing this!! It's always helpful to know what hits home.
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Brett Bartholomew Sep 9
Replying to @Coach_BrettB
Find common ground, watch body language, probe, relate, be patient & listen.
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Brett Bartholomew Sep 9
Replying to @Coach_BrettB
It reveals what's at the center of what they really want. Many influence strategies such as these do not vary between large or small groups because they are based on a common principle; that people want to feel like their concerns are acknowledged and matter.
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Brett Bartholomew Sep 9
We assume that every time that an athlete voices an opinion that they want us to answer a question rather than listen to a concern. Listening, TRULY listening, reveals context that can be leveraged into future sessions and interactions.
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Brett Bartholomew Sep 8
Timely discussion given the recent situation. Thanks to for gracing the podcast with his presence and beard. ⬇️
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Brett Bartholomew Sep 8
“Find your passion” is often well intentioned advice but the truth is that it can be misleading. Watch my this video to hear why.
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Brett Bartholomew Sep 7
Replying to @ACXBasketball
Appreciate the feedback!
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Brett Bartholomew retweeted
Adam Grant Sep 7
When you face a choice between being polite and being honest, err on the side of the truth. It's better to be disliked but respected than to be liked but disrespected. In the long run, the people we trust the most are those who have the courage to be sincere.
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Brett Bartholomew Sep 7
Replying to @CoachVMcC
Thanks Vince! Would love to hear how you’ve been. We are overdue.
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