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Steven Slate
Steven Slate, BRI Research Fellow. Co-author of The Freedom Model for Addictions, and blogger at
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Steven Slate Jun 14
If Richard Degrandpre decides to make a new edition of his magnificent book The Cult of , he’ll need to add a chapter on JUST LET PEOPLE HAVE GOOD OLD FASHIONED OPIATES
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Steven Slate Jun 9
Replying to @maiasz
regardless - naloxone can be lifesaving, AND *some* can react to it's availability with more reckless behavior. Both these things can be true - they aren't mutually exclusive. And noting it isn't equivalent to opposing naloxone.
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Steven Slate Jun 9
Replying to @maiasz
The author said that the distribution of naloxone probably explains California's relatively lower overdose death rates. I don't see where he made *as strong* a statement about increased use resulting from the presence of naloxone.
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Dr. Rick Barnett Jun 6
Bill approved lets pharmacists rx prescriptions, over doctors' objections 😊🙏🏽 and have also faced much opposition from physicians. There’s no monopoly on prescribing rights. ⁦⁩ ⁦
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Steven Slate Jun 4
Some interesting history of the gateway theory.
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Steven Slate Jun 4
Pharma-Cos aren’t sending their best meds.
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Steven Slate Jun 4
You have a point about their current status. I should say: 2 million people are on MAT meds for OUD. Some, I assume, have been in remission for a year or more, no longer fitting the diagnostic criteria for OUD.
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Steven Slate Jun 3
This is a general healthcare problem. That doesn't make it right or acceptable, but it also doesn't mean this is a unique "barrier to treatment" for people w OUD. Despite any claimed barriers, approximately 2 million people are currently on MAT for OUD.
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Steven Slate Jun 3
I've had primary care docs in past that could never get me in within a week. Pediatricians are a nightmare for many parents. My sister-in-law is constantly struggling to get the kids in for things like strep that require immediate attention.
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Steven Slate Jun 3
We need to recognize this isn't unique to seeking MAT. I went through much worse seeking a specialist recently - the first two pages of results on my insurance company's "find a doctor" portal were no longer accepting my insurance. Those that were had a week or two wait.
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Ryan Schwantes Jun 1
“Calling Addiction a Disease Does Not Reduce Stigma”
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advisortomen May 29
No kidding. I took a lot of flack over the years as a counsellor for not adhering to the disease model of addiction. I knew I had learned to be addicted, and that it was not a pre-existing condition within me...
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Steven Slate Jun 1
The Freedom Model for Addictions, chapter 10 - on the growth mindset
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Steven Slate Jun 1
Aren’t benzos often involved? I see no mention of that here.
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Steven Slate May 31
Replying to @drrickbarnett
The question I have and honestly have no clue as to the answer is: how well does it prevent fentanyl OD? How do the binding powers compete, etc. I’ve searched for some kind of answer but haven’t found a good source yet.
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Steven Slate May 31
Replying to @Mathildabee
What I’m getting at is that probably 99% of people who die by OD have received treatment. Every OD story I ever hear of is a person who’s gotten a lot of treatment - which should raise eyebrows when we’re regularly told that only 10% receive treatment annually.
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Steven Slate May 31
I’d be genuinely shocked if more than 1% of Americans who died of drug over the past twenty years had never received addiction treatment.
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Steven Slate May 31
Replying to @Ssmith02598631
And it’s not so much that SAMHSA under-reports, though some of their presentations do by omitting the distinction. It’s more that activists use this incomplete data to support their claim that is underutilized.
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Steven Slate May 31
Replying to @Ssmith02598631
Because they only survey “specialty treatment” facilities, and this doesn’t include private physicians who prescribe from normal doctor’s offices.
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Steven Slate May 31
Replying to @CalebHowe
“Doctored”?
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