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Dr. Catherine Prendergast
Let's take a look at the original study that said that pen and paper note-takers learned more than those taking notes with a laptop. (Thread)
Taking notes on laptops rather than in longhand is increasingly common. Many researchers have suggested that laptop note taking is less effective than longhand ...
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Dr. Catherine Prendergast 24 Nov 17
Replying to @cjp_still
It's based on two studies, one of 67 students at Princeton, and another of 149 students at UCLA.
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Dr. Catherine Prendergast 24 Nov 17
Replying to @cjp_still
For the Princeton study, that had students watch TED talks and take notes with or without laptops. Laptops were disconnected from the internet.
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Dr. Catherine Prendergast 24 Nov 17
Replying to @cjp_still
Then students were taken to a lab, distracted for half an hour, and asked to recall factual v. conceptual info. Laptop note-takers did better on factual, not on conceptual.
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Dr. Catherine Prendergast 24 Nov 17
Replying to @cjp_still
Feeling that the verbatim task was no enough like real life learning in the classroom, they repeated the study at UCLA, not asking students to record info verbatim.
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Dr. Catherine Prendergast 24 Nov 17
Replying to @cjp_still
The UCLA student were also shown the TED talks, and asked to record notes thusly: "We’d like you to take notes on a lecture, just like you would in class."
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Dr. Catherine Prendergast 24 Nov 17
Replying to @cjp_still
In short AT NO POINT did this now oft-cited study EVER measure learning of students IN AN ACTUAL CLASSROOM or with laptops hooked to the internet, where students could look up info they didn't understand.
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Dr. Catherine Prendergast 24 Nov 17
Replying to @cjp_still
I can't think of a less authentic studying design to measure learning, and the fact that so many folks fall for this snake oil is maddening.
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Dr. Catherine Prendergast 24 Nov 17
Replying to @NYT
Please read the study for yourselves if you have access. It was cited in the Scientific American, and in this week's article calling for banning laptops in the classroom.
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Dr. Catherine Prendergast 24 Nov 17
Replying to @NYT
Before we ban laptops in lecture halls, we should at leasts study how students use them. Really use them. Not how you told select students to use laptops unconnected to the internet watch a pre-recorded Ted talk.
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Dr. Catherine Prendergast 24 Nov 17
Replying to @cjp_still
In short AT NO POINT did this now oft-cited study EVER measure learning of students IN AN ACTUAL CLASSROOM or with laptops hooked to the internet, where students could look up info that they didn't understand.
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Dr. Catherine Prendergast 24 Nov 17
Replying to @cjp_still
I can't think of a less authentic study design to measure learning, and the fact that so many folks fall for this snake oil is maddening.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr. Catherine Prendergast 24 Nov 17
Replying to @NYT
Please read the study for yourselves if you have access. It was cited in the Scientific American, and in this week's article calling for banning laptops in the lecture hall.
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Dr. Catherine Prendergast 24 Nov 17
Replying to @NYT
Before we ban laptops in lecture halls, we should at leasts study how students use them. Really use them. Not how you told select students to use laptops unconnected to the internet, while watching a pre-recorded Ted talk.
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Dr. Catherine Prendergast 25 Nov 17
Replying to @resolvingdust
WTF Indeed! How exactly is that supposed to resemble your average college lecture?
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Dr. Catherine Prendergast 25 Nov 17
Replying to @resolvingdust
Ah but that wouldn't be "controlled."
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Ryan Edwards 25 Nov 17
Replying to @cjp_still @dynarski
... this does though. and mentions issues above before discussing it in the NYT piece you mention.
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Dr. Catherine Prendergast 25 Nov 17
Replying to @ryanbedwards @dynarski
Thanks! I'll dissect that one next. i expect it will be as poorly done as the two others I reviewed.
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Chris W J Roberts 25 Nov 17
Replying to @cjp_still
I ran informal exp in large (230 student) first year class this term. I urged heavy laptop uses to sit at the tables w/ plug-ins. Classroom had three sections (2 with plug-ins/1 without). Results over 2 mid-terms: average of approx 1.1% lower mid-term grades for laptop heavy area
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Dr. Catherine Prendergast 25 Nov 17
Replying to @cwjroberts
I've conducted my own informal political science experiments. That said, I'm not a professor of political science. May I introduce you to the field of Writing Studies.
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