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Chris McCord
Creator of the Phoenix Framework, Author of Metaprogramming Elixir, Programmer at , builder of things
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Chris McCord retweeted
Andriel Nuernberg Jul 16
Another great use case for the . Also using the new live_link/live_redirect APIs.
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Chris McCord retweeted
Phoenix Framework Jun 26
Phoenix stickers have arrived! Find at ElixirConf to add to your collection
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Chris McCord Jun 20
writing books is hard and takes time. Writing books while writing frameworks and languages is hard and takes time. Doing all this while fulfilling family/work/life obligations is hard and takes time, etc etc :)
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Chris McCord Jun 18
Replying to @nickjanetakis
There’s a reason I built this which puts me 5 feet from the saw vs
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Chris McCord Jun 17
Replying to @jeramyRR
Thanks! It’s drying in a raised, covered car port, so rot from bugs and elements won’t be an issue
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Chris McCord Jun 17
Replying to @knewter @_AlexGaribay
I believe I can officially run a 27 bar on mine, so if a bigger tree presents the challenge, we’ll find out how it does :D
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Chris McCord Jun 17
Replying to @knewter @_AlexGaribay
Words of internet wisdom is to go with a 60cc or larger saw if you plan on milling. I went with an echo cs-590, which is ~60cc and it held up great thru a 17 inch log. Very happy with it so far, but larger can’t hurt if you have huge trees and are planning to run a 24”+ bar
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Chris McCord Jun 17
Replying to @knewter @_AlexGaribay
Thanks! Time is def a limiting factor. It only took two days to build it, but the cutting process with setup, getting log prepped, + cleanup was a full day for 1 slabbed up 10 ft log. Not doing for ROI though. If you’ve got the logs standing/laying on your property, go for it!
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Chris McCord Jun 17
Replying to @redrapids
Mantel for our fireplace with one of them. Others no idea. Table/coffee table/cabinet/furniture likely
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Chris McCord Jun 17
Replying to @gregspaghetti
Yep! Based largely on his design. I deviated in a few places so I wouldn’t need to drill holes in my bar, but I watched his video, then threw a pile of scrap wood in a pile and started building :D
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Chris McCord Jun 17
Replying to @Bicx
Based largely on Izzy Swan’s design
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Chris McCord Jun 16
Replying to @_AlexGaribay
This cut was 2 1/4 for our mantel. Others were around 1.5-2. Other than the mantel, no idea what yet what I’ll use it for. Anything that I’d like to use oak for :D Likely some furniture pieces in the future
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Chris McCord Jun 16
Replying to @jody_lecompte
Will definitely need planed after it dries for finished pieces. Surface is rough cut, but it would be fine as is for something like a mantel (which one of these slabs will become :)
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Chris McCord Jun 16
Replying to @chris_mccord
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Chris McCord Jun 16
Chainsaw mill round two with a bigger log was a success! I was able to pul the log into place with a rope and lift it up with some dolly maneuvering. Cut time was was 10 minutes, so here’s sped up 10x:
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Chris McCord Jun 15
Replying to @jdludlow
Let’s be fair. A stock phx app ships with webpack for an *optional* js/css build chain. LiveView has exactly one runtime js dep - phoenix.js, which has zero js deps
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Chris McCord Jun 13
You also only write HTML (EEx) with LiveView, so we don’t have any special HTML DSL. Our templates are not HTML aware, but we are able to support diffing by tracking static and dynamic parts of the template
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Chris McCord Jun 5
Replying to @eachus
Thanks! If you're referring to the transitions from sapwood to heartwood in the offcut, that's the shape of the log, not vertical movement of the sled on the track.
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Chris McCord Jun 4
Replying to @json_louis
omg 🤯
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Chris McCord Jun 4
afaik an uncut log will never properly dry out, on reasonable timeframes at least. If it was sitting for years uncut, you'd still need to stack and air or kiln dry it
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