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Chris Friend
Students must feel safe in schools because fear and duress prevent full presence, engaged thoughtfulness, and the ability to question and learn. If a student worries about how their identity is accepted, the perceived surveillance limits what the student brings to the table.
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Chris Friend Jun 23
Replying to @chris_friend
This is why we have anti-harassment and anti-discrimination policies—they reassure marginalized groups that they are welcome as themselves, giving conversation and learning a place to begin. Until and unless that safety exists, debate is unbalanced or false.
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Chris Friend Jun 23
Replying to @chris_friend
Folks in marginalized groups worry about the quality of their work only after knowing they are safe in their workplace. They worry about scholarly engagement only after knowing they are safe in their school. They decide where to attend based upon where they can be themselves.
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Chris Friend Jun 23
Replying to @chris_friend
Until and unless folks in marginalized groups know they have protection, those groups remain at the mercy of authorities. Institutions dictate what they can do, who they can be. Stock’s letter presumes that academic debate can exist in the absence of safety, when it cannot.
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Chris Friend Jun 23
Replying to @chris_friend
The ongoing debate is tricky. Both sides agree that academics must have the freedom to question and challenge ideas and value systems. Those who penned the letter want to ensure they can challenge their institution’s stance—but they already have the protection of the institution.
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Chris Friend Jun 23
Replying to @chris_friend
Those of us who object to the letter do so because we see a marginalized group of students losing protections they need in order to be safe. It’s not a debate over whether we’re forced to use “ze” or “ve” pronouns. It’s whether the students or the faculty need protection.
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Chris Friend Jun 23
Replying to @chris_friend
Hybrid Pedagogy has, since long before I was involved, advocated for the protection and liberation of marginalized groups—from adjunct labor to queer folks to neuroatypical instructors. At its core, the journal works to ensure safety for those groups.
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Chris Friend Jun 23
Replying to @chris_friend
Just as marginalized students who feel unsafe in school face obstacles to learning, marginalized authors who feel unsafe in journals face obstacles to writing. Hybrid Pedagogy’s editorial work (staff & processes) must first and foremost provide safety.
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Chris Friend Jun 23
Replying to @chris_friend
For a journal to argue adamantly for the liberation of marginalized students, its staff cannot then become—or even appear—the oppressor. Before any debate can take place, our authors must be safe. Stock’s letter threatens that safety and precludes the debate we seek.
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Chris Friend Jun 23
Replying to @chris_friend
This issue, for Hybrid Pedagogy, is not a matter of shutting down an argument or censoring a perspective. It is about holding space for a group that needs protection against the entrenched powers of authority already in place.
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Jane Waring Jun 25
Replying to @chris_friend
I agree. But how about the female students who feel afraid? Afraid to question? Who are, in fact, told that certain topics are not for debate? Who feel under pressure to accept ideas which they do not in reality believe? Surely their ability to learn will be adversely effected?
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Dashka_Va Jun 25
Replying to @chris_friend
Chris writes 'Students must feel safe in schools because fear and duress prevent full presence, engaged thoughtfulness, and the ability to question and learn'. Quite so. This is one of the reasons why girls and women need their legally protected spaces in schools.
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Loubert Jun 25
Replying to @chris_friend
Couldn’t agree more, this should include female students as well who often feel worried and body shamed during periods. If female students do not feel happy accessing toilet facilities this leads to well documented non attendance in education.
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Cate Denial Jun 24
Replying to @chris_friend
This is a marvelous thread, Chris, and I'm sorry to see you being targeted for making it.
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Jesse Stommel Jun 24
Replying to @cjdenial @chris_friend
♥️
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🔥☠️ Ghostrider in the Sky! ☠️🔥 Jun 28
Replying to @chris_friend
"Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me." When did you forget that?
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Arwen Webb Jun 24
Replying to @chris_friend
Yeah, oppressed groups MUST feel safe in education, even the ones who make up 1/2 the population. Which is sex based rights are SO important. Read this, it *may* help.
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Kerstyn Comley FRSA Jun 24
Data from both and Manchester Uni showed a peak in both panic attacks and suicidal ideation at the start of the academic year. Sadly, for many young people school is a place of fear or anxiety.
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Filipa Antónia Jun 23
Replying to @chris_friend
Fear and duress is being shot in the head on your way to school because zealots don't like women to study. Having people not agreeing with you only scares cowards.
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ws Jun 25
Replying to @chris_friend
So you agree that single SEX toilets and changing rooms must be provided and strictly controlled so that girls don’t have to fear predatory males claiming their “identity “ trumps female safety?
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