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Cherry Thompson 🧬
*stirs the tea* There is no "accessibility options" & "options" All options are accessibility Let's work to destigmatize & stop segregation. We're repeating the same mistakes as society Language is power [gif: unpalatable tea stirred with a stick & passed to grimacing hilda]
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Cherry Thompson 🧬 Sep 20
Replying to @cherryrae
- I say this gently - I've said this many times. If you're about to reply justifying why we should call some things accessibility features & not others, I've probably heard it. I'm yet to hear an argument that outweighs the harm stigmatization/segregation does. It's OK though!
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Cherry Thompson 🧬 Sep 20
Replying to @cherryrae
There's always potential we get things wrong with language and marginalized communities. There's always the potential we marginalize them more with the way we talk about things. It's about listening, taking it seriously, thinking and doing better.
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Cherry Thompson 🧬 Sep 20
Replying to @cherryrae
I was immensely greatful to see Celeste updated with better language. It SHOWS how much it matters and that we can change the world. We can say one thing at a time, but if we keep steamrollering without stopping and assessing then harm becomes harder to undo.
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Cherry Thompson 🧬 Sep 20
Replying to @cherryrae
When I started out, I campaigned to get developers to think about options AS accessibility, we're THERE now!! (So exciting!) And sadly we've ended up with the same traps of society - that some things are 'accomodations' and 'special' or 'extra' while others are core features
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Cherry Thompson 🧬 Sep 20
Replying to @cherryrae
Additionally we're getting problems where some think that 'accessibility options' or 'accessibility features' is all there is to accessibility when that's really not it. It was a jumping off point. There's so much more work to be done! Usability is a core structure for design.
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Cherry Thompson 🧬 Sep 20
Replying to @cherryrae
All this to say, if we don't stop and reflect on how we're approaching things, especially with regards to vulnerable groups of people in society we can't truly innovate. Ethical obligations impact every aspect of design, not least accessibility (usability).
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Cherry Thompson 🧬 Sep 20
Replying to @cherryrae
One day this will be a talk but I feel like I'm stuck in this loop of only ever having time/space for 101 introductions and squeezing these side-topics in with that is, OOF.
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David Moore Sep 20
Replying to @cherryrae
Interesting! I mean, yeah, even graphics setting ls are totally an accessibility thing. Game developers COULD make you meet a single minimum bar but they put effort into making the game playable on a wide a variety of machines. Accessibility.
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Cherry Thompson 🧬 Sep 20
Replying to @EffortlessFury
Sort of!! That's kind of stretching the definition of accessibility as it pertains to usability - although there is socio-economic accessibility/approachability of course. But, more to the point, in my work I've discovered many disabled players use those settings for access
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Kal Cobalt Sep 20
Replying to @cherryrae
I love this. It has a very “there is no spoon” vibe. And it’s a great point like calling people “temporarily able-bodied” — serves to help people learn to flip the script. We *must* think without prejudice before real, deep, lasting lessons can get integrated into biz models.
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