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Carl Miller
Author, The Death of the Gods: The New Global Power Grab, Research Director, CASM, Demos. Speaker.
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Carl Miller 3h
I am in total awestruck wonder at the people who are experts in fintech AND blockchain AND AI AND cyber security AND IoT A Professor I know has spent thirty years working on natural language processing and thinks anything not distributional semantics is outside his lane.
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Carl Miller 4h
You know - one of the problems with trying to spot bots on social media platforms is (1) some real people use social media a horrendous, terrifying almost literally inhuman amount, and (2) there are quite a lot of maniacs that behave far less believably human than a machine can.
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Carl Miller retweeted
Carl Miller Mar 7
Here's the cover for the paperback version of my book - with a great big BLOODY PRIZE MEDALLION on it. If you're dying to know how power is changing in the digital age but hardbacks aren't your thing - its cheaper, lighter cousin can now be pre-ordered
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Carl Miller retweeted
Catrin Nye 7h
Since they started their mass protests say they have seen a huge rise in donations and have raised £194,000 in 8 days of actions. They say 75% of donations are between £10 & £50 (approx 510 donations per day). From Jan to 22nd April they have crowdfunded £365,000.
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Carl Miller retweeted
Carl Miller 18h
1/When you ask for your data back, there are actually three layers that companies hold. 1. Data you've volunteered 2. Data that's been generated about you 3. Data that's been inferred. Layer 3 is where the action happens. I always get 1. I sometimes get 2. I've never got 3.
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Carl Miller 10h
Replying to @ndiakopoulos
Yeah! But I’ll save that for another way-too-long Thread :)
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Carl Miller retweeted
Carl Miller 12h
This is a way-too-long thread about easy vs. difficult solutions to digital problems. And today the problem is: online influence, often completely misunderstood as fake news In policy circles, one solution is dominant: digital literacy What's not to like about education, right?
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Carl Miller 11h
Mikah Laiberg! Honestly, pianos are the best investment in our public spaces for a long time.
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Carl Miller 12h
Replying to @carljackmiller
We keep doubling down on education. And it's actually wrong. It's uncontroversial, it's easy, it looks good. And it's genuinely not going to solve this problem - especially for the people who most need it solved and are most vulnerable to it.
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Carl Miller 12h
Replying to @carljackmiller
They're based on feeling and emotion, not ratiocination, and it is entirely unclear how any suite of critical digital literacy would have caused people to avoid being influenced by it.
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Carl Miller 12h
Replying to @carljackmiller
(5) Literacy-based approaches fundamentally misunderstand the problem that they would be implemented to solve. A ‘literacy’ skill implies a rational process: Reader > Fact > Critical Engagement > New belief. That's not how online influence often works..
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Carl Miller 12h
Replying to @carljackmiller
(4) Educational interventions will not be able to reach the people most vulnerable to online influence. Older people are more likely to share 'fake news' (I hate that term), and are often deliberately, specifically targeted by online influence activities.
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Carl Miller 12h
Replying to @carljackmiller
(3) The presence of crudely automated Twitter accounts has produced the sense that online influence can be identified by normal people following a short series of steps. The reality is that specialists in the tech giants can not always find it at scale.
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Carl Miller 12h
Replying to @carljackmiller
(2) Likewise, the technologies available to conduct online influence activities are also certainly going to change much more rapidly than the capacity of any educational intervention to up-skill a population to deal with them.
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Carl Miller 12h
Replying to @carljackmiller
(1) The actual practice of online influence operations is developing very rapidly. You can't assume that a stable body of knowledge or skills will be sufficient to increase the resilience of a population to a problem that changes faster than it does.
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Carl Miller 12h
Replying to @carljackmiller
It's all about citizen empowerment. It doesn't force the Government to define the truth. And tech giants love it: they've thrown loads of money at digital literacy programmes across the globe. Everyone's being trained to spot fake news. However, its simply not going to work.
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Carl Miller 12h
This is a way-too-long thread about easy vs. difficult solutions to digital problems. And today the problem is: online influence, often completely misunderstood as fake news In policy circles, one solution is dominant: digital literacy What's not to like about education, right?
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Carl Miller 14h
Since 2010, political parties and governments have spent more than half a billion dollars on the research, development, and implementation of psychological operations and public opinion manipulation over social media. That hasn't all gone on working out how to build Twitter bots
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Carl Miller 15h
Replying to @LiamMurray
So what's the problem with telling someone that the company thinks they're 80% likely meeting the 31st data-point? If that's being used to make decisions about someone, I don't see why anyone can hide behind the probabilistic nature of data science.
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Carl Miller 16h
Huge congrats to my friend - one of the best tech think tankers in the country - are very lucky to have got him.
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