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Cabinet Magazine
Cabinet is a quarterly magazine of arts and culture that believes curiosity is the very basis of ethics.
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Cabinet Magazine retweeted
Brian Dillon Nov 6
I have two essays in the new issue of – the Knowledge issue. The first is on an extraordinary Hilary Mantel sentence about Princess Diana. And the second is about the long history of melancholia as a type of knowledge.
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Cabinet Magazine retweeted
Catherine Keyser Nov 7
I am so pleased and proud to have an essay in this issue of . From the Trix rabbit to Brer Rabbit, from "natural color" to the Froot Loops in *Get Out*, the hunger for color and the body politics of purity
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Cabinet Magazine Nov 7
Cabinet 65 (“Knowledge”) is now available in print and online! Amy Knight Powell on why rectangles rule the world of art on the Trix rabbit, race, and “colorful” breakfasts Cecilia Sjöholm on the power of naming
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Cabinet Magazine Nov 6
In 1871, pigeons with cameras helped besieged Parisians communicate with the outside world. Tom Vanderbilt on microphotography and the pigeon post
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Cabinet Magazine Nov 5
Renaissance “Wunderkammern” were housed in palaces and churches; a few centuries later, their treasures would stuff bourgeois salons. on the riches-to-rags story of the curiosity cabinet
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Cabinet Magazine Nov 1
The Japanese aesthetic of sabi venerates wornness, the patina of age and use. Allen S. Weiss on “guinomi” vessels
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Cabinet Magazine Oct 31
“Boot girls” advertised using an intricate signaling system of leather and lace colors. Mel Gordon on the sex workers of Weimar Berlin
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Cabinet Magazine Oct 30
Forty years after the Nazi surrender, investigators located the skull of Josef Mengele in Embu, Brazil. Thomas Keenan and on forensics and atrocity
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Cabinet Magazine Oct 29
In 1947, Grace Murray Hopper found a squashed moth inside a malfunctioning supercomputer. Colin Sonner on the etymologies of “bug”
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Cabinet Magazine Oct 28
Schizophrenics have long described eye-screwing, sight-stopping, roof-stringing, vital-tearing, fibre-ripping, or otherwise terrifying devices that persecute them from afar. on “influencing machines”
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Cabinet Magazine Oct 27
Jumping spiders are the only known invertebrates able to recognize images on a television screen. on ’s study of arachnid intelligence
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Cabinet Magazine retweeted
The Cullman Center Oct 22
Gorgeous new issue of just arrived, feat. past Fellows and D. Graham Burnett
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Cabinet Magazine Oct 22
Who owns ancient remains, bodies so old as to confound race and nationality? Philip Scher on Ötzi & Kennewick Man
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Cabinet Magazine Oct 21
Who needs Hamilton when you’ve got Exxon and Coca-Cola to sing along with? Jonathan Ward on the lost world of “industrial musicals”
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Cabinet Magazine Oct 20
Too many rainforest dragons! Not enough death adders. Clem Blakemore on the “surplus and wanted” lists of zoos
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Cabinet Magazine Oct 19
When Eugène Delacroix compared early nude photographs to Renaissance drawings, he complained that the new medium had “spoiled the masterpieces.” Alexi Worth on how photography defamiliarized the human body in art
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Cabinet Magazine Oct 18
The short-lived “US Camel Corps” began with seventy-seven animals and a Syrian camel driver named Hadji Ali. AUDC (Robert Sumrell & Kazys Varnelis) on a Quixotic military venture
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Cabinet Magazine Oct 17
Why on earth would we want to eat at the movies—a space so dependent upon visual and auditory concentration? Amelie Hastie on taste, memory, repetition, and sensory overload
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Cabinet Magazine Oct 16
Ruins have been seen, variously, as extensions of nature, repositories of knowledge, and remnants of the future. ’s “Fragments From a History of Ruin”
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Cabinet Magazine Oct 15
Gerhard Zucker, inventor and onetime Nazi rocketeer, dreamed of a postal system of “dirigible mail-rockets.” remembers the original “letter bomb”
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