Twitter | Search | |
Cabinet Magazine
Cabinet is a quarterly magazine of arts and culture that believes curiosity is the very basis of ethics.
889
Tweets
511
Following
5,134
Followers
Tweets
Cabinet Magazine Jan 17
Ever wondered about the “bell” in dumbbell? Eighteenth-century enthusiasts used church bells for athletics and mathematics. on campanology
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine Jan 4
Gustav Zander is the godfather of modern gym equipment. But his vision of “exercise” largely involved letting the machines work on you. Carolyn de la Peña on the prehistory of Cybex
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine Dec 17
Drugs were important to Walter Benjamin, confirming his approach to reality and revolution, art and politics. Michael Taussig on hashish, yagé, and the muse
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine Dec 5
The rectilinear codex—the form of the book we still know today—triumphed over the curvilinear scroll around the year 300
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine Dec 4
Hogarth called it the line of beauty. Sterne made it the symbol of a bachelor’s freedom. And Balzac twisted it into the “serpentine trace” of early modern capitalism. on the etymology of a literary doodle
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine Dec 3
Nearly a century before McDonalds, there was the “Harvey House.” Jeffrey Kastner on a railroad restaurant chain and the prehistory of American fast food
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine Dec 2
“Sodaconstructor” models are like digital organisms—a vast evolutionary experiment authored by a global community. interviews the program’s designer
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine Nov 30
France has promised to return 26 artworks plundered from Abomey, Benin in 1892. In “Gift of General Dodds,” explains how they got there in the first place
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine Nov 26
What’s the significant difference between mind and algorithm? Join this Thursday evening (7:30) at our Berlin office for a talk—and participatory experiment—on free will and computation
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine retweeted
Justin E. H. Smith Nov 26
I'm giving a lecture/conducting an experiment, hosted by in Berlin, this Thursday evening. Come if you're in town!
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine Nov 23
Galen believed that without nutrition, human bodies would pop like balloons. Jonathan Allen on the Holy Spirit, rubber balloons, and the bubble-like nature of human life
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine Nov 22
America’s first English settlers were familiar with turkey—first brought to Europe by the conquistadors—but not the plump, wild variant that roamed Eastern North America’s woods. An interview with Andrew F. Smith
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine Nov 22
The God of Genesis “gave his adorers the supreme example of ideal laziness; after six days of work, he rested for eternity.” Marina van Zuylen on Paul Lafargue and the right to be idle
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine Nov 21
Haggling can seem “a shameless contest in deception” but it is actually “an honorable ritual.” Herant Katchadourian on making a deal
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine Nov 20
The figure of the cannibal played a leading role in the emergence of early modern philosophy. interviews Cătălin Avramescu on the intellectual history of anthropophagy
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine Nov 19
Before it meant laziness, “sloth” could refer to busy distraction, purposeless hyperactivity, or spiritual malaise. Daniel Rosenberg on the changing idioms of idleness
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine Nov 18
How did the slot machine get its cherries? Marshall Fey on the many disguises of gambling machines
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine Nov 17
Rudolf van Laban aspired to create a universal notation for dance, a “kinetography” of more than 1,421 symbols. on a dionysian ecstatic and his “labanotations”
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine Nov 16
For the American food industry, color means gaiety—an association with a long racial history. on the white rabbit and his colorful tricks
Reply Retweet Like
Cabinet Magazine Nov 15
How did the rectangle become Western art’s anatomical limit? Amy Knight Powell on triptychs, cubism, and codices
Reply Retweet Like