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Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture
Now open to the public! It's a new kind of museum—and a whole new way to experience our world. Located on the Northwest corner of campus in Seattle.
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Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture 3h
Replying to @kirstisaur
Have a great visit! (And very cool teeth!)
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SALISHSTYLE.COM 3h
The Weaver's Welcome greets visitors with its palms facing up and out, a traditional Coast Salish gesture of welcome.
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Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture 18h
“Dec. 26 to Jan. 5, there will be daily Arctic storytime at 11 a.m., with items from the museum’s collection that kids can touch, including a walrus tusk, a sperm whale tooth, orca teeth, polar bear fur, a harbor seal pelt, and baleen.”
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Christian A. Sidor Dec 4
Here's a picture of Sterling in 2007 collecting one of the first bones of Asilisaurus in the Ruhuhu Basin of Tanzania.
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National Geographic Dec 4
The nearly complete skeleton belongs to Gnathovorax cabreirai—one of the oldest meat-eating dinosaurs in the world
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Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture Dec 4
We're thrilled to welcome Dr. Alejandro Rico-Guevara to the Burke! Dr. Rico-Guevara studies how the physiological, anatomical, and behavioral aspects of hummingbirds drive their evolution and relationship with ecosystems.
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Kelsie Abrams Dec 3
Serrations on the caniniform tooth of a Gorgonopsid. As if they were scary enough, they have steak-knife saber teeth. 😱
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Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture Dec 3
Raegan is up to her gills in small fish, but she won't stop until she's FINished identifying them all 🐟As a UW student and Burke Museum volunteer, she's helping ID fish in the ichthyology collection native to the Salish Sea.
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Dave Slager Dec 2
Replying to @burkemuseum
Feathers from the ill-fated Ross's Gull are now at the . While they dry you can view them through the public window looking into the prep lab.
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Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture Dec 2
Artist is inspired by Indigenous traditions of communal practice. Her 60-foot-tall mural, “Synecdoche," represents intersections between history, culture, and contemporary pop culture in the Pacific Northwest.
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Dave Slager Dec 1
So far today... -ran Seattle half marathon -biked to see lifer adult Ross's Gull within my 5 mile birding radius -watched Bald Eagle kill, pluck, and eat it -saved a few meaty pinkish feathers for the Burke Museum ...it's not even 5pm
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Sharlene Santana Dec 1
This morning was dry enough that I was able to move my office to the forest & download data from our recorders & cameras (which saved me a lot of walking!). We’ll have tens of thousands of acoustic files + hundreds of videos to sort through from this field season😱
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Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture Dec 1
Anyone else working on puzzles over the holiday weekend? Piecing together fossil fragments can sometimes feel like a high stakes puzzle. Alex, a Paleontology volunteer, is piecing together fragments from the tip of Triassic Phytosaur skull.
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Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture Nov 30
This piece features model of a ocean-going canoe and the gear used, including carved and painted Makah style paddles, clubs, wooden storage boxes, sealing harpoon, floats, and a cedar bark sail. By Dusty Humphries (Jamestown S'Klallam and Makah) & Rachel Martin (Makah)
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Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture Nov 29
Replying to @FlyingEagle8956
(3/3) Shore pine is known from the Puget Trough of Marysville away from the immediate coast, so its occurrence here is not wholly unexpected.”
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Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture Nov 29
Replying to @FlyingEagle8956
(2/3) The glaciers retreated from Snohomish County approximately 12,000 years ago, and these trees are likely less than 100 years old. We would consider these plants to be recent arrivals whose occurrence is not associated with past glaciation events.
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Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture Nov 29
Replying to @FlyingEagle8956
A staff member with our Herbarium says: “The first part of answering this question would be to determine that these trees are either P. contorta var. contorta (shore pine) or P. contorta var. latifolia (lodgepole pine), both of which occur in Snohomish County. (1/3)
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Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture Nov 29
Replying to @jzimbabwe
Gorgeous shot! 😍
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Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture Nov 29
This depiction of the Fremont Troll by Tlingit artist Alison Bremner inspired her next interpretation of the troll for the Burke Museum. Bremner said "The coloring here was a take on how Seattle smells in the summer, the pavement and the car exhaust and the sun and the water."
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Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture Nov 29
Replying to @FlyingEagle8956
Hi Roman, Thanks for reaching out! I will send this question along to our Herbarium team to see if they can tell us more about it. We’ll be in touch! - Cathy, Burke Museum
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