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Bram Hubbell
Q3: For many of us, the story of the Revolutions in Period 5 (1750-1900) focuses on people of European descent. How can we challenge that pattern and foreground peoples of African and indigenous heritage?
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Jennifer do Carmo 24 Jan 19
Replying to @bramhubbell
A1: I created a mock trial based on the trial of Micaela Bastidas, Tupac Amaru’s wife and co- conspirator. It highlights the intersection of gender, indigenous identity and Spanish colonialism.
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Jennifer do Carmo 24 Jan 19
Replying to @bramhubbell
2/ her story challenges both the Enlightenment/Atlantic focus for revolutions as well as the gendered narrative of revolutions in general. She embodies and her life expresses the deep tradition of gender parallelism in indigenous societies.
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Thanasis Kinias 24 Jan 19
Replying to @bramhubbell
A3: the most obvious way is to make Haïti an integral part of the AoR, but another important theme IMO is that of Black Loyalists in the AmRev and their resettlement in Nova Scotia and later Sierra Leone—the Black Loyalists complicate the emancipatory narrative of the AmRev 1/
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Thanasis Kinias 24 Jan 19
Replying to @bramhubbell
We can also tell the story of 7Yr War/AmRev/1812 with Indigenous peoples at the center—what do these stories mean for the autonomy of First Nations/Native Americans? How does increasing settler self-government affect Indigenous peoples? 2/
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Angela A. Lee 24 Jan 19
Replying to @bramhubbell
Here's another article from World History Connected (they need a handle!) that makes references to de-center the Haitian Revolution away from the European narrative, and to look at some of the African influences for the revolution:
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