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Martin
currently writing 'Finding Ancient Grassland' Botanical surveyor and artist. If it's about plants, I'll be interested.
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Martin Jul 9
Boulby is good for heather in August - that's on the shale
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Martin Jul 9
😁We don't have it up here - but link here says calcareous grassland, preferably grazed. I can't think that I have seen anything other than photos of it - lovely plant.
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Martin Jul 9
Replying to @whiterosegreen
narrow-leaved?
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Martin Jul 9
I would guess the rampion but only because I really like it!
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Martin Jul 9
yes - very much and we have at least 4 orchid species on our road verges (off the top of my head) though sadly no frog orchid up here. I think key to this will be if we can remove some grass cuttings for anaerobic digestion which I have to follow up...
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Martin Jul 9
Age of community in relation to historic management is factor that affects some of the factors Richard raises - paper here (scroll down)
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Wendy English Jul 8
The best local guide to wildflowers by the much missed Nan Sykes is now available as a facsimile edition from for £11.50 incl p&p. Thanks to
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Martin Jul 8
If you are in a rural area in North East Yorkshire or the Humber then grants are available for developing renewable energy projects - stage one not too difficult if you are used to applying for grants
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Martin Jul 8
my mum grows them in her garden and they seem to last a few years and then die off, fortunately they seed themselves around easily (often in the cracks between the path flagstones) and so she always has a replacement - hers mainly red but we did once have one of the white ones
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Martin Jul 8
I'm convinced out there somewhere is a strain of hogweed with pink flowers, purple stems and interesting finely lobed leaves ... that people will want to grow in their gardens. That's one of the best pinks I've seen so far. This the best from this year in my area
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Martin Jul 8
Interesting paper on grassland management, ostensibly to see the effect on orchids but cutting has big effect on meadowsweet which declines by a third in 7 years but there's an increase in smaller species
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Martin Jul 8
thank you!
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Moira O'Donnell Jul 5
A very striking Hogweed, Heracleum sphondylium, on a Hampshire road verge.
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Martin Jul 8
that is gorgeous 😍😍😍
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Martin Jul 8
I think this is a white flowered form of Clary (Salvia sclarea) - there are photos of the form var. turkistanica and 'alba' that look similar. Lovely looking plant to find in the wild!
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Martin Jul 8
Normally in gardens you see the red ones and there is also a pure white flowered strain that people like to buy to grow in a white garden. There is also this which is a bit of both. So the answer is ... it's all in the genes 😀
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Martin Jul 8
saw that and thought it a good idea. Landscaping near the new houses up there is using green hay from the Cemetery which is a real positive - I'm chatting to the consultant about it next week
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Martin Jul 8
definitely - it sadly didn't happen on one of the recent new M'bro Ind. estates (lollipop trees and grass) and I don't want to miss another opportunity to do something uniquely Tees Valley
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Martin Jul 8
If it were done in small patches in specific areas it wouldn't be too intrusive and if signs are put up at the same time then it could also educate re dog dirt nutrient hazard
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Martin Jul 8
Replying to @whiterosegreen
when they put in the sewage pipe they didn't sow any seeds - they separated the 'topsoil' and just put it back on top and left it after we advised them to do that. dog dirt is grim in that area.
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