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Jim Millard
Evolving husband, father, and Physiotherapist. Enjoying the journey and learning everyday! Body Mechanics London, MulliganConcept, COMPASS Interactive
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Jim Millard retweeted
Helen Riess, MD Jan 23
ICYMI - This article from Joseph Stern, MD was in the print edition on Monday. "In my experience, connection & are far more important than certainty. Patients & families want to know that you care about them."
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Jim Millard Jan 22
SDT and Coaching should be on every Physios training list. 🙏
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Jim Millard Jan 22
Replying to @PressPlayPhysio
Nice to see we made the list at Body Mechanics! It shows that good therapeutic relationships are still valued more so than just a shiny and new space as I am as old as my space now lol. We are in the “People” business!
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Jim Millard Jan 21
Replying to @PressPlayPhysio
Great job Emma!
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Jim Millard Jan 19
Replying to @proskoyoga @MaxiMiciak
Empathy, Acknowledgement, Validation, Reassurance and moving forward together! 🙏
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Jim Millard retweeted
Maxi Miciak Jan 18
“I don’t want him/her to just sit there and listen to me, I want to have a genuine, mutually respectful conversation.“ This is a great point. It’s not just about allowing someone to tell the story - it’s about being receptive to the story and engaging.
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Jim Millard retweeted
🚴🏻‍♂️ ɹǝʇlnoԀ pıʌɐᗡ 🚴🏻‍♂️ Jan 18
Replying to @Retlouping
Physiotherapists as detectives: investigating clues and plots in the clinical encounter
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Jim Millard retweeted
Helen Riess, MD Jan 16
"In my experience, connection & are far more important than certainty. Patients & families want to know that you care about them." -David Stern, MD. Important article for patients, family members and :
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Jim Millard retweeted
Firmansyah Purwanto Jan 8
Practices to Foster Physician Presence and Connection With Patients in the Clinical Encounter
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Jim Millard retweeted
Derek Griffin Jan 7
Five step to a successful clinical encounter: ✅(1) take a moment to prepare and focus before greeting a patient); ✅(2) listen intently and completely ✅(3) agree on what matters most ✅(4) connect with the patient’s story ✅(5) explore emotional cues
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Jim Millard retweeted
#WorldJuniors Jan 5
You know the words to this one! 🎶🏆🇨🇦
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Jim Millard retweeted
Peter O'Sullivan Jan 2
We see PT care for LBP looking something like this 👇👇👇
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Jim Millard Jan 2
Replying to @DrSethPT @Retlouping
Absolutely Seth! I feel the authors want to build physio up. The others just seem to want to tear it apart.
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Jim Millard retweeted
Rhodri Parfitt Jan 1
Contemporary treatment for persistent MSK conditions.. “education, advice and shared decision making, a management plan, underpinned with empathy and support” This is the direction we need to heading in!
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Jim Millard retweeted
Jeremy Lewis Dec 31
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Jim Millard Jan 1
Agree Poults. Elephant in the room is that some here are not in the treatment room and do not treat patients. We are not reading it from the same context. As a practicing physio treating patients I thank the authors for this! 🙏
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Jim Millard Jan 1
Replying to @Retlouping
Well said Poults 🙏
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Jim Millard retweeted
Thomas Mitchell Dec 26
Of course, is another form of symptom modification. All types of SM valid if they mean something to the patient and work in the context of the individual Best to avoid ‘adjunctivitis’ and make sure the core components of Rx in place first.
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Jim Millard retweeted
Key Clinical Skills Dec 26
Great algorithm for the appropriate use of MWMs in modern clinical practice. Manual therapy that makes sense
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Jim Millard retweeted
Brett Bartholomew Dec 23
Still so tiring seeing “art vs. science” debates in coaching. It’s not either or- there’s a science to the art and vice versa. Quit focusing on divides and instead learn to appreciate the interconnectedness between “things.” Coaching is complex, not complicated.
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