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Bob Burrough
Since this is obviously not true, the only possible options here are: - Apple believes this is true, and they're too foolish to see how it isn't. - Apple doesn't believe this, and they're misleading customers for marketing reasons.
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Tom Klaver Mar 5
Replying to @bob_burrough
Isn’t this about storing your Safari browsing history in iCloud?
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Bob Burrough Mar 5
Replying to @klavr
If that's all it's intended to convey, the language is so broad as to be untrue.
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Shawn Platkus Mar 6
Replying to @bob_burrough @klavr
I don’t understand what you think isn’t true about that statement. It says this information lives on your Apple device. Which is actually true.
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Bob Burrough Mar 6
Replying to @platkus @klavr
It isn't true in the slightest. Every time you use Facebook, Google, or visit any website, information about you is stored, sold and shared with hundreds of third parties. e.g. Google definitely knows your browsing history.
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Shawn Platkus Mar 6
Replying to @bob_burrough @klavr
I think you are reading something into it that isn’t there. It says “information…lives on your Apple devices.” Then it lists examples-one of which is websites visited. It says they design devices to protect that info and let you choose what you share. I believe all that is true.
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Bob Burrough Mar 6
Replying to @platkus @klavr
Information DOES NOT live solely on your Apple device. That's absurd. I suspect you're missing some technical understanding about how Google and 3rd parties track you. They even agree to share code on each other's websites to get around cookie-storage privacy.
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Shawn Platkus Mar 6
Replying to @bob_burrough @klavr
It isn’t about technical understanding. It’s clear you are talking about something other than what is stated. It never says it solely lives on your device. It just says that they design the products to protect the information on your device. I believe that’s true.
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Shawn Platkus Mar 6
Replying to @bob_burrough @klavr
It’s like saying they protect the pictures you take on your device. No one can easily look at your selfies album to find out what you look like. But if you post that picture on social media, then people can see what you look like If you visit websites that track you it’s the same
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Bob Burrough Mar 6
Replying to @platkus @klavr
Reconcile these statements: - "What websites you visit. ... Every Apple product is designed from the ground up to protect that information. And to empower you to choose what you share and with whom." - Google knows what websites you visit, even if you never visit Google.
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Shawn Platkus Mar 6
Replying to @bob_burrough @klavr
Easy. “What websites you visit” is an example of the previous statement about information that lives on your device. Google is not getting a list of websites you visit from your safari history on your device. Empowering you to choose comes in the form of what websites you visit.
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Bob Burrough Mar 6
Replying to @platkus @klavr
That's a good analogy, but I think it misses the fact that the public at large doesn't think that when they visit , that literally hundreds of companies are being notified.
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Bob Burrough Mar 6
Replying to @platkus @klavr
"Empowering you to choose comes in the form of what websites you visit." That is not a reasonable position.
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Shawn Platkus Mar 6
Replying to @bob_burrough @klavr
True enough. But that’s not what Apple is talking about. Apple is talking only about information that they store on your device. Websites aren’t getting that. They are compiling their own data and building their own list. Same result maybe, but different points.
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Bob Burrough Mar 6
Replying to @platkus @klavr
That's like saying "When you use an app, you agree to share all of your information with that app by virtue of using it."
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Shawn Platkus Mar 6
Replying to @bob_burrough @klavr
Isn’t that the case though in practice with a good many apps? Apple does the best job of limiting what personal info apps can access I think, but when you give permission to access photos you’re giving location data of the photos and apps can compile that data on you.
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Bob Burrough Mar 6
Replying to @platkus @klavr
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Riccardo Mori Mar 6
The phrasing on that page may lead less tech-savvy people to believe that “Your heart rate after a run. Which news stories you read first. Where you bought your last coffee. What websites you visit. Who you call, email, or message.” is all info that’s only stored locally. Not so.
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Shawn Platkus Mar 6
Replying to @bob_burrough @klavr
I don’t give Facebook access to my photos. If I share a photo on Facebook, I do it from the photos app via the share extension. Facebook only gets access to that one photo.
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Eric Young Mar 6
Google doesn’t need to ping your browser history - because they don’t need to Google Ad network covers over 97% of the internet. You visit a website, they know it’s you
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