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Backyard Larder
I am Alison Tindale. I'm mostly talking about perennial vegetables: my discoveries about how to grow & cook these special veg and plants for sale on my website.
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Backyard Larder 8h
Perennial kales! - some Daubenton kale and Taunton Deane kale plants in the shop at last.
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Backyard Larder 18h
Early morning cowslips
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Backyard Larder 18h
Replying to @trotter_alex
Ah Terry Pratchett - various thrillers, murder films came up when I searched for Night Watch/Nightwatch!
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Backyard Larder 18h
Replying to @trotter_alex
Ah Terry Pratchett - various thrillers, murder films came up when I searched for Night Watch!
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Backyard Larder 19h
Wayfaring tree.
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Backyard Larder 19h
Replying to @trotter_alex
No, just what I think when I see the cow parsley start to get going at this time of year.
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Backyard Larder 19h
Up she rises...........
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Backyard Larder Apr 20
Replying to @MgniM @VicBCGardens
It is a different genus, Crambe maritima. Very hardy I believe, Zone 5. But can rot around the neck unless in very free-draining sand or gravel at that point.
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Backyard Larder Apr 20
Replying to @MgniM @VicBCGardens
Yes it must be frustrating. Can you grow sea kale?
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Backyard Larder Apr 20
Replying to @MgniM @VicBCGardens
I forget how lucky we are for gardening conditions here until I hear from northerly continental gardeners.
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Backyard Larder Apr 20
Replying to @Englishomestead
I don't really know yet Kev. I lost my first one in a less well-drained bed despite having added sand and gravel. Haven't seen any pest damage to date other than slugs being quite keen.
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Backyard Larder Apr 20
Replying to @MgniM @VicBCGardens
Oh gosh, the best way to kill things off!
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Backyard Larder Apr 20
Replying to @Englishomestead
It has a fishy taste, pleasantly so, maybe of oyster but I've never tasted those.
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Backyard Larder Apr 20
Replying to @MgniM @VicBCGardens
Would you be zone 5? Long-lasting snow cover?
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Backyard Larder Apr 20
Replying to @MgniM @VicBCGardens
Possibly Rumex sanguineus, bloody dock or red-veined sorrel. Best eaten very young I find.
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Backyard Larder Apr 20
Replying to @MgniM @VicBCGardens
I love sorrel. Found this unusual use for it last Christmas. Very easy to make too!
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Backyard Larder Apr 20
As I'm away from home Stew has just sent me some allotment photos. This oysterleaf, Mertensia maritima, is still revelling in its new home on the sandy bed. A salad vegetable, it has lovely blue flowers later in the year and is also called sea bluebells.
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Backyard Larder Apr 20
Replying to @VicBCGardens
Yes that is close to my way of thinking. Although I seem to spend the time gained in discovering and planting new ones!
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Backyard Larder retweeted
simon wilson Apr 20
Well finally i have seen the little owl at after months of waiting. Even though it is blurry getting dark and used a high iso and so far away, hand held at 600. Im still chuffed to bits.
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Backyard Larder Apr 20
Replying to @VicBCGardens
Thanks Kathryn. You do me great retweets - spreading the perennial veg love!
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