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Alex Singh
Over the past 25 years, the web appears to have transitioned from a primarily nomadic culture to a mostly agrarian one, mirroring the Neolithic Revolution 10,000 years ago.
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Alex Singh Jul 20
Replying to @automaticyes
The simplicity of HTML-only site building, spaces like Geocities & Angelfire, and cultural artifacts such as web rings coupled with poor search engine tech saw us navigate the web like nomads: from point to point, link to link.
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Alex Singh Jul 20
Replying to @automaticyes
The web has developed & so have the skills necessary to build within it. HTML was easy. CSS took a little more time & JS more again, alienating most and establishing a class hierarchy. Discovery was solved, weakening point-to-point navigation.
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Alex Singh Jul 20
Replying to @automaticyes
The literate Priesthood can still build & interface with the web, but the vast majority of people are relegated to the peasantry. "Fortunately" for them, motivated benefactors have offered a Faustian bargain to make their lives "easier".
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Alex Singh Jul 20
Replying to @automaticyes
Corporate Feudalism has emerged to create centralized, "safe" spaces for the peasantry to work & play. Attention is farmed and sold in exchange for convenience, protection, mediated self-expression & an indifferent audience. You can do anything if it's within their borders.
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Drew Stephens Jul 24
Replying to @automaticyes
20 years ago I was a freewheeling nomad with my own website, and now I'm a peasant, working a plot of land for the Duke of Instagram.
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Kevin Kwok Jul 24
Replying to @automaticyes
Attention = corn. The resource that has warped everything around it to adapt their societies to its needs
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KimSia Sim 🇸🇬💻📗 Jul 24
unroll pls
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Thread Reader App Jul 24
Replying to @KimStacks
Saluti there is your unroll: Share this if you think it's interesting. 🤖
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@pcmaffey ÷ Jul 24
Replying to @automaticyes
the dark ages cometh
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Alex Singh Jul 25
Replying to @kevinakwok
What does “wild” Attention look like, pre-media? I.e. Teosinte
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Trent H. Jul 25
Replying to @automaticyes
So, what will the Renaissance look like?
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Alex Singh Jul 25
Replying to @GamingTrent
A mirage of the original, sadly.
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Alex Johnson Jul 25
Replying to @automaticyes
this is great. but what's the comparison for moving to Apps? the web carved up and repackaged again, but in silos?
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Elvin Yung Jul 25
Replying to @automaticyes
"State science continually imposes its form of sovereignty on the inventions of nomad science. State science retains of nomad science only what it can appropriate."
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Alex Singh Jul 25
Replying to @ElvinYung
Link? Attribution? Curious to read more.
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Elvin Yung Jul 25
Replying to @automaticyes
Oops sorry, it's from the chapter on Nomadology in Deleuze and Guattari's A Thousand Plateaus!
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Elvin Yung Jul 25
Replying to @automaticyes
But this is actually interesting -- I've vaguely been working on a piece about how making software should be more like a nomad science than a state science, so it was delightfully surprising to stumble on your thread!
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Alex Singh Jul 25
Replying to @videoalex
I don’t see a distinction between the two.
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Alex Singh Jul 25
Replying to @ElvinYung
Ah yes, 1000 Plateaus is part of my never-ending reading list for my Ambient Product Design research. I'm developing a concept called Liminal Nomadism, that considers us "nomadic navigators" through artificial liminal spaces (apps, etc.).
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