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Australian Museum
Australia's first museum, showcasing an outstanding natural history and cultural collection. A New South Wales Government funded cultural institution.
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Australian Museum Nov 19
Little known about the adult life of the Mecynodera, AM's entomologist Dr Chris Reid studied the beetle found in his backyard from larva to adulthood
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Australian Museum Nov 14
Only 2 days left for 2019! Make sure you download the free app and get frogging this weekend! 🐸🐸🐸 Image: Neobatrachus sutor (aka Shoemaker Frog) Credit: Dane Trembath
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Australian Museum Nov 14
We are very proud to have teamed up with to create this very special trailer.
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Australian Museum retweeted
Jacqueline Nguyen Nov 14
Hear the inspiring from talk about her research at the and free public lecture "Wildlife Detectives" next Fri 22 Nov at ! Register here:
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Australian Museum Nov 13
Did you know, thousands of visitors from outer space land on Earth every year? We’re talking meteorites of course! Learn all about meteorites & tour the night sky with AM’s Ross Pogson this Sat 16 Nov. Book tickets here
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Australian Museum Nov 13
Thanks for sharing . We're halfway through and we've had 2,000 calls submitted! We encourage everyone to download the app and start recording frog calls. Every call counts!
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Australian Museum Nov 13
Fancy heading up to Lizard Island to study the effects of plastic pollution in the coral reef? Apply now!
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Australian Museum Nov 13
Our identification request of the week: These egg capsules are of a carnivorous marine snail () known as cart-rut shells, Dicathais orbita. Eggs change colour with age/hatched status. Purple fresh, pink older & cream oldest 📷: J. Speck
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Australian Museum Nov 7
is finally here - help us get 10,000 records of frogs across Australia! Download the free app on your phone & record as many calling frogs as you can between 8 - 17 November. 🐸🐸🐸
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Australian Museum Nov 5
Take part in from 8-17 November and help us get as many calls as possible from as many places as possible!
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Australian Museum Oct 30
Can you solve this mystery? 🎃👻 Sound on!
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Australian Museum Oct 30
Scientists know very little about the biodiversity of Malaita, Solomon Islands. Recently spent time with the Kwaio community – who have an intimate knowledge of the island – to study local frogs. A fascinating story shared with :
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Australian Museum retweeted
FrogID Oct 28
That's right! Its another species ticked off the list for . Rebecca Boulton recorded and submitted the call of the Walpole Frog (Geocrinia lutea). 190 down - wonder if we can make it to 200 this year!??? Stay tuned for which species we are missing... 😍🐸
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Australian Museum retweeted
Jodi Rowley Oct 28
Good news! We found Booroolong (Litoria booroolongensis) last night out and about on the New England Tablelands of , despite the drought. & I rediscovered this pop 40 y since they were last seen & are now surveying sites to find out how they are doing.
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Australian Museum Oct 27
Replying to @jodirowley @FrogIDAus
We *need* video of what looks like a frog calling cup in action!
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Australian Museum Oct 24
Bunurong/Tasmanian Yuin man, Bruce Pascoe, delivered a brilliant talk last year here at the Museum, on the subject matter of his award-winning book Dark Emu – Black Seeds: Agriculture or Accident? You can now listen to the full talk:
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Australian Museum Oct 23
We're thrilled to see our Director & CEO announced as a finalist in the 2019 !
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Australian Museum Oct 21
Tonight at Anzac Memorial Hyde Park 's Mark Carey explores the fundamental role of glacial ice in global economics and politics, and within imaginative, historical and colonial narratives for the penultimate series talk:
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Australian Museum Oct 21
Replying to @austmus
The southern hairy-nosed wombat is slightly more common, but still listed as Near Threatened. It's the state animal of South Australia.
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Australian Museum Oct 21
In the mid 19th century this was known as the hairy-nosed wombat, beautifully illustrated by John Gould. We now know there's a Northern variety, one of the rarest land mammals in the world, with only roughly 200 individuals existing within a sole 3km² range in QLD.
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