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Dr. Jessie Christiansen
NASA Research Scientist | | advocate | Science curator at | She/her | Married to | Mum of twins
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
Okay and that was my whole hour of internet tonight on the shared modem, typing up those notes for you folks, so read the thread! And goodnight! I will try to post more tomorrow.
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
And on that sobering note, we're done for the day!! You made it to the end of the thread! Yay! Thanks for coming on the ride. And maybe you have more/different thoughts about astrobiology than you did an hour ago. I certainly did after today.
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
Audience: "Once you succeed you will have more money than you know what to do with. How do you carry the field until then?" Andrew: By counting the upper limits as successes. Rebecca: Unfortunately, the current scientific culture does not reward negative results.
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
Congress did away with SETI funding in 1993, and that had a chilling effect on a generation of academia – SETI was seen as verboten or wacky. It has taken 25 years to recover.
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
There is a bullet point about the “continued failure” of SETI. Andrew Simeon responds: “I fundamentally disagree with the premise of that bullet.” He posits that putting upper limits on detections is continued progress and success, not failure.
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
I am enjoying how excited is about watching all the sky, all the time. Frank Drake: “We need to look in as many places as possible. That’s all. That’s the whole game.”
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
From the audience: “Are Kardashev Type II and III civilisations in the universe going to be ruled out in the next few decades?” Jason: “I’m looking forward to SPHEREx, but the universe is too damn dusty.”
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
Rebecca Charbonneau: “Is science fiction and popular culture around SETI to its detriment, or its support?” Jason: “It cuts both ways.”
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
Extensive discussion by the panel on the fact that the USSR SETI scientists had much more speculative ideas than their American counterparts at the height of SETI in the 60's and 70's. That's really interesting. I wonder what the cultural differences were that led to that.
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
“I feel bad interrupting Jill.” (Jill Tarter was phoning into the panel).
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
Frank Drake is literally pretending to be a dolphin. He then says that the USSR scientists working on SETI in the 60’s and 70’s were brilliant, and “true, red-blooded, proper scientists!” In case you were wondering.
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
And we're back for a post dinner+drinks panel. I will say, SETI is even more interesting after a very strong gin.
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
We break for a vaguely Asian-cuisine dinner, and someone's fortune cookie is very auspicious for the discussions at hand: “Good news will come to you from far, far away.” 🤣😍👽
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
[Aside: Have there ever been so many space telescopes watching the same thing at the same time? She had four!]
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
Wow, got eight (8!) different telescopes from ALMA through to Chandra (including TESS and Hubble and SWIFT!) to observe proxima Centauri near-simultaneously. What an incredible feat. I can’t wait to see the dataset.
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
BOOM!
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
Charley: You didn’t say anything about interferometry. Rus: Thanks for letting me know.
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
Rus Belikov: A gibbous-phase Earth around alpha Cen B is detectable with the WFIRST coronagraph if it doesn't get cut. (Me: For reals? That's wild).
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
It’s really amazing to be here with so many formative astrobiology pioneers, who are recalling their formative colleagues and the famous Green Bank meetings from the 60's and 70's. Is it possible to be part of something so memorable?
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Dr. Jessie Christiansen 2h
“A mote of dust, suspended in a sunbeam.” – Carl Sagan
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