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Bendor Grosvenor PhD 17 Apr 18
1 - Thread on the Home Office destroying the landing cards. Here's how the system should work. Under the Public Records Act, govmt departments must transfer archive records to within 30 (now 20) years.
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Bendor Grosvenor PhD 17 Apr 18
Replying to @UkNatArchives
2 - if departments want to keep records for longer than this, as the Home Office did for these papers (until 2010), they must submit a 'retention application form', setting out the reasons why the records need to be retained in the department and not sent to .
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Bendor Grosvenor PhD 17 Apr 18
Replying to @arthistorynews
3 - That retention application is considered by an independent body of historians, archivists and so on (on which for seven years I used to sit). Therefore, there should at some point have been a retention application made for the Windrush disembarkation papers.
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Bendor Grosvenor PhD 17 Apr 18
Replying to @arthistorynews
4 - I can assure you that the body, called the Advisory Council on Public Records, would have been well attuned to the value of a historical set of records relating to the Windrush generation.
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Bendor Grosvenor PhD 17 Apr 18
Replying to @arthistorynews
5 - The Home Office says the Windrush records were destroyed 'under the Data Protection Act', because departments are not supposed to keep records containing personal data for longer than that data is necessary. But this is nonsense.
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Bendor Grosvenor PhD 17 Apr 18
Replying to @arthistorynews
6 - 1st, the Data Protection Act relates primarily to records created post 2000. 2nd, the records were still being used, and of value to the people whose information they contained. 3rd, there is a clear exemption in the Act for material of historical value.
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Bendor Grosvenor PhD 17 Apr 18
Replying to @UkNatArchives
7 - As makes clear, personal data should only be destroyed as part of the retention process, not ad hoc. There is no way the Advisory Council, or indeed anyone with half a brain, would have sanctioned the destruction of the Windrush papers.
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Bendor Grosvenor PhD
8 - So to conclude: a) I cannot understand how records of this importance were destroyed; b) there will be a paper trail setting out who did it, and why; c) the government's record management system is not fit for purpose (which is why I resigned from the Council).
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Bendor Grosvenor PhD 17 Apr 18
Replying to @arthistorynews
PS - one day I'll tell you about the time the Cabinet Office told porkies in order to keep the Profumo Enquiry papers secret. I fought for months to make the papers open, but sadly lost - they're closed till 2048.
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Graham J Gibson 17 Apr 18
Replying to @arthistorynews
As sane and as illuminating as ever Bendor, thanks.
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Piers Doughty-Brown 17 Apr 18
Replying to @arthistorynews
Err hint Dr Bendor ?
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Alert Level 3 ARE WE CERTAIN ???? 18 Apr 18
Replying to @arthistorynews
Thanks for taking the lid off this.
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BournemouthforEurope #FBPE 18 Apr 18
Replying to @arthistorynews
Thank you for your insights and this useful thread Bendor. It just looks like either a reckless disregard for people's lives or maybe even a determined effort to wipe out that part of history
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Bill Wells 18 Apr 18
Shift from paper to electronic files was not well handled. It happened piecemeal. So there was no consistent and comprehensive transfer from paper to electronic files. Nor, importantly, knowing where to look for paper files. Also, there are no fixed protocols for electronic files
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Jackie Scoones ❤ Join a Union 18 Apr 18
Replying to @arthistorynews
Thank you for explaining the landing cards should have been archived they are obviously of historical importance.I assume the decision to destroy them had ministerial approval.
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Dr Gillian Jack 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿 🇪🇺 18 Apr 18
Replying to @arthistorynews
I'm fairly certain people are at present destroying that paper trail too.
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oscarfranklin #StopTheCoup 18 Apr 18
Replying to @arthistorynews
Yes - apart from the monstrous injustice done to Windrush children and their families, the loss of information useful to social scientists, historians, epidemiologists etc. etc. is pretty bad. But the injustice and the racism it highlights is unforgiveable.
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Benny Fitzscrounger 18 Apr 18
Now you know why exactly the EU want to know what system the UK will work with for the 3 million EU citizens who are already here.
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