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ANZJOG
The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (ANZJOG). Official publication of . in , supports
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ANZJOG Jan 13
The NZ 2019 ASM will be held in Hamilton from Wednesday 22 to Friday 24 May with pre and post workshops on the Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday. Abstract submissions close 6 March 2019. Check the NZ ASM website for more information:
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ANZJOG Jan 1
Harmonisation of research outcomes for meaningful translation to practice: The role of Core Outcome Sets and the CROWN Initiative
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ANZJOG Dec 31
Labour-inducing drugs put to the test. 's Dr Kassam Mahomed compared intravenous oxytocin infusion to prostaglandin gel for women who chose to have their labour induced: via
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ANZJOG Dec 31
Induction of labour with oxytocin or vaginal prostaglandins are safe and efficacious options for women in the context of pre‐labour rupture of membranes at term:
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ANZJOG Dec 30
Both Federal and state governments in Australia contribute funding for prenatal and diagnostic testing. Despite this, significant out-of-pocket costs can remain. Read more in this article:
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ANZJOG Dec 29
Minimally invasive approaches to hysterectomy have been shown to be safe and have recovery advantages over open hysterectomy, yet in Australia 36% of hysterectomies are still conducted by open surgery. Learn more:
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ANZJOG Dec 28
What’s the population‐level contribution of maternal overweight and to adverse outcomes? Read on to learn more:
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ANZJOG Dec 27
The number of women at risk of excessive, potentially life-threatening bleeding immediately following childbirth is rising: via
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ANZJOG Dec 27
The incidence of primary postpartum haemorrhage, severe primary postpartum haemorrhage and associated maternal morbidities have increased significantly over time in Victoria:
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ANZJOG Dec 26
In 2015, the Tabbot Foundation launched a nationwide direct‐to‐patient service to enable women to obtain medical without visiting an abortion provider. Read on to learn more:
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ANZJOG Dec 25
Some Australian parents are paying 1000% more out of their own pockets to have a baby than they would have done 25 years ago: via
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ANZJOG Dec 25
Since 1992/3, out‐of‐pocket charges increased by 1035% for out‐of‐hospital items and 77% for in‐hospital items. Learn more:
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ANZJOG Dec 24
The Centre of Research Excellence in and have recently partnered in updating an important clinical practice guideline: ‘Care of pregnant women with decreased fetal movements’. Learn more:
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ANZJOG Dec 23
In the 1960s, an unethical clinical study that withheld treatment from women diagnosed with cervical cancer was conducted in New Zealand. This article describes the management and outcomes of these women:
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ANZJOG Dec 22
Ready for a ? Take a look at this opinion article from our April issue. law reform: Why ethical intractability and maternal morbidity are grounds for decriminalisation:
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ANZJOG Dec 21
Not all women who set out to labour and birth in water achieve their aim. There is a need for high‐quality collaborative research into this option of labour and birth, so women can make an informed choice around this birth option. Read more:
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ANZJOG Dec 21
Water births are becoming popular in Australia, but half who want it won't take the plunge: via
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ANZJOG Dec 20
Over the next 12 days we will be sharing this year’s most impactful ANZJOG articles. Stay tuned for inspiring, enraging and insightful .
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ANZJOG Dec 19
This 2008 paper looks at the claims of and single women to have access to Assisted Human Reproduction (AHR) in New Zealand, discusses legislation, rulings and regulations, as well as the opinions of people who have been involved in this issue:
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ANZJOG Dec 17
Cultural and linguistic diversity in Australia is increasing rapidly. How does country of birth, race and language affect pregnancy outcomes?
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