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Andy Puddicombe
Headspace. Former Buddhist monk. Watch: Read: Meditate
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Andy Puddicombe 12h
Replying to @Lucy_Stone @Headspace
love that...and love that you are both using Headspace. Meditation is a good habit to learn for sure.
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Andy Puddicombe 15h
If mindfulness of thought feels too challenging at times, then mindfulness of body and mindfulness of speech can be really useful to practice throughout the day. Here's a great reminder from the creative team
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Andy Puddicombe Aug 15
Most of us are quick to spot confusion in the outside world, or in others, but we're slightly less inclined to notice it in our own mind
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Andy Puddicombe Aug 15
Thanks for having me on the show Chelsea! Loved hanging out. And of all the pronunciations of Puddicombe I’ve ever heard, barracuda is my favorite by far!
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Andy Puddicombe Aug 14
The heart of is learning to rest in uncertainty. It is thought alone that gives the illusion of security. Once we put down the storyline, there is nothing but wide open space
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Andy Puddicombe Aug 13
Negative thoughts. Are thoughts themselves negative, or is it more about our reaction to them that creates the discomfort and stress? It's a common topic, so here's an that's neither negative nor positive ... but it might prove helpful
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Andy Puddicombe Aug 12
Replying to @foysey @Headspace
Sure. We tend to live within the confines of the thinking mind, where we perhaps believe our thoughts (and accompanying behavior) define us as humans. But in meditation we see that our mind (and the world) is limitless - as is our potential
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Andy Puddicombe Aug 12
What we do, what we say, what we think, even what we feel, may define our experience of life, but none of it defines the limitless nature of mind. To train the mind is to witness this for ourselves. To witness this for ourselves is to find peace of mind
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Andy Puddicombe Aug 12
Replying to @joeyyandell
a lot of studies have limitations but it seems the primary focus of this study was improving fear memory/emotion regulation (ie: the changes in the hippocampus).
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Andy Puddicombe Aug 12
Replying to @PeppathePigg
In the tradition in which I trained we were encouraged to be present with that movement, to allow it, and that way the focus was simply a shifting one-pointedness rather than a static one
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Andy Puddicombe Aug 12
Can increased understanding of our habitual thought-patterns help to decrease anxiety and fear?
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Andy Puddicombe Aug 9
we're grateful to have you among the Headspace community. Sorry to hear you've had such a tough time but you're the one showing up, each day.
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Andy Puddicombe Aug 9
There is nowhere we can go to escape the mind. It will find us wherever we are. Far better to sit down and make friends with the mind, to come to a mutual place of understanding
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Andy Puddicombe Aug 9
How to show up for meditation each day — love what the creative crew did in transforming this age old analogy into a beautiful new animation
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Andy Puddicombe Aug 9
happy to have accompanied you on your journey, as a friend sitting with you every day ...and long may it continue
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Andy Puddicombe Aug 8
Sometimes, life is difficult. Sometimes, things just don't work out as planned, no matter what we do, no matter how good our intention. Accepting this simple truth somehow takes the sting out of these situations
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Andy Puddicombe Aug 7
Struggle to sleep on a plane? Wrestle with jet-lag? Our long-time friends know how hard it is criss-crossing timezones, so the crew have turned to Sleep by Headspace...even better still, they've now made it freely available on all transatlantic flights.
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Andy Puddicombe Aug 6
Couldn’t agree more - and these two are extra special! Thanks for having us all along for the run Eddie
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Andy Puddicombe Aug 6
It is very easy in a relationship to be attached to an idea of the other person, established over time, rather than seeing who they are in this moment and relating to them as they are right now
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Andy Puddicombe Aug 5
Replying to @amanw
The good news is that it needn’t be confusing. Just start with the basics and then choose the course that feels most relevant to you right now. Some techniques are better for particular situations and sometimes having specific context can really make a big difference
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