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Allen Holub
I think that many large groups can get by just fine without a "leader." Consider an orchestra. The conductor is not the "leader" in the sense that business people use the word. They're the coordinator. They provide a vision for the piece as a whole. 1/4
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Allen Holub Jan 7
Replying to @allenholub
But they communicate that vision, not cajole people to play along. They don't "own" the piece. The group as a whole "owns" it. There's a big difference. Everybody in the orchestra wants to produce the best result collectively. 2/4
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Allen Holub Jan 7
Replying to @allenholub
The musicians do the best job they can individually, but they can only produce music by following the people around them. In a sense, everybody's a follower. 3/4
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Allen Holub Jan 7
Replying to @allenholub
In a jazz band, the base player might be providing the root of a chord while the piano player fills in the top notes. It's the whole ensemble that makes the music. Nobody's leading. Everybody's paying attention. Everybody's following everyone else's lead. 4/4
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Allen Holub Jan 7
Replying to @allenholub
Same notion applies to "ownership." The conductor doesn't own the music.
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Jeremy Pulcifer, Overwrought Pedantist Jan 8
Replying to @allenholub
That’s not a great analogy. A conductor sets the pace, as well; I witnessed a world-class orchestra (SF Symph) nearly fall apart because the visiting conductor decided to ‘conduct’ whilst playing the lead in a concerto.
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Allen Holub Jan 8
Replying to @jeremypulcifer
A six-foot-high metronome could do that. Setting the pace is not leading.
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Duncan Jan 8
Replying to @allenholub
Sounds really good for an ideal world. Where do you put members' egos? The ambition to outdo others and get set up for promotion/raises?
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Allen Holub Jan 8
Replying to @Duncan18200619
I've worked in/with organizations where those things were not a factor at all. Instead, we were focused on Ryan & Deci's (as per Dan Pink's "Drive") criteria: Relatedness, autonomy, mastery, purpose. Those are much stronger motivators.
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derek graham Jan 8
Replying to @allenholub
Orchestras are ALL hierarchy and control. There’s usually an orchestra leader as well as a conductor and section leaders for each instrument group
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Allen Holub Jan 8
Replying to @deejaygraham
During play, you sometimes can't even hear the "section leader."
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