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Since June 7, the world's best female footballers have been in competition for the Women's World Cup. While FIFA is anticipating over 1 billion views, women's soccer is still troubled by mismanagement and misogyny. Can these problems be fixed? explores: (1/15)
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AJ+ Jul 5
Replying to @ajplus
Many of the teams who qualify for the Women's World Cup have legendary histories but get little support from their federations. Argentina's women's team in particular fought sexism and mistreatment to get to this year's World Cup in France. (2/15)
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AJ+ Jul 5
Replying to @ajplus
Nigeria's team has won the Africa Cup nine times & more championships than their male counterparts. Yet after getting eliminated from this year, staged a sit-in to protest the fact that they're still owed salaries and bonuses. (3/15)
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AJ+ Jul 5
Replying to @AdaStolsmo
Meanwhile is currently missing their most decorated player, , who skipped the tournament to protest the pay discrepancy between the men's and women's leagues. She is the face of UEFA's new gender equality campaign . (4/15)
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AJ+ Jul 5
Replying to @USWNT
Even more dramatically, the reigning world champions are now suing the U.S. Soccer Federation for gender discrimination. The case will go to mediation after the tournament is over & has sparked solidarity from women athletes around the world. (5/15)
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AJ+ Jul 5
Replying to @ajplus
Some federations are trying to improve the quality of women's soccer. has been developing their junior women's team programs, and the country's football association has mandated that each men's team must have a women's counterpart by 2020. (6/15)
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AJ+ Jul 5
Replying to @ajplus
Money isn't the only issue. Women in football also worry about safety. Last year, the Afghanistan Women's National Team presented horrific allegations of abuse by AFF President Keramuddin Karim … which FIFA and the AFC apparently knew about. (7/15)
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AJ+ Jul 5
Replying to @ajplus
In many parts of the world, soccer-playing Muslim women face Islamophobia for wearing hijabs. Although FIFA lifted a headscarf ban in 2014, France – the host – still doesn't permit players, coaches or officials to wear hijab. (8/15)
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AJ+ Jul 5
Replying to @ajplus
Allowing hijab on the pitch would give France a huge boost. There are long-standing ties between immigrants and football. 7 of the 11 starting players for France's women's team are from the African diaspora & may have some have Muslim lineage. (9/15)
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AJ+ Jul 5
Replying to @ajplus
Despite these problems, there have been disruptions of the status quo. Groups in France are pushing to lift the hijab ban, and former England player Clare Rafferty has spoken about combating the racist and anti-gay slurs used by women footballers. (10/15)
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AJ+ Jul 5
Replying to @LesDegommeuses
One club leading the fight against homophobia and racism in women's football is . Through raising awareness about the diversity within women's football in France, they're trying to change public perceptions of the sport. (11/15)
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AJ+ Jul 5
Replying to @dmatheson8
In Canada, the women's national team decided to unionize in 2016. As veteran player explained, "We want it to be more stable for younger kids coming up so they know they can earn a living through soccer." (12/15)
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AJ+ Jul 5
Replying to @mPinoe
In recent years, women footballers have often been at the helm of social movements. player was the first white athlete to kneel in solidarity w/American football player Colin Kaepernick against racism and police brutality in the U.S. (13/15)
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AJ+ Jul 5
Replying to @hajrakn
Pakistan women's football team captain is working with UNICEF to raise awareness about menstrual hygiene, & after years of pressure, FIFA Pres. Gianni Infantino recently asked Iran to lift a 40-year ban on women entering football stadiums. (14/15)
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AJ+ Jul 5
Replying to @jj_Roble
And the future of football might already be on the field. As the UK's first black, Muslim, hijab-wearing Somalian refugee, is showing future generations of fans and players that football is for all of us. (15/15)
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Guy Scafidi Jul 5
Replying to @ajplus @_shireenahmed_
The men's tournament get 3 to 4 times the views, why should the pay be the same?
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Sandra Pons Jul 5
If numbers are all that matter, why should anyone pay attention to you? You have 35 followers and has close to 16k...
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Guy Scafidi Jul 5
I shouldn't get paid for using Twitter or endorsements like someone who has more followers. Even if I tweet more.
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Geoffrey Wilson Jul 5
Replying to @ajplus @_shireenahmed_
Sure. It’s all someone else’s fault
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