Twitter | Search | |
Adrian Cotterell
Middle School Teacher | Director of Teaching & Learning | ICT Coordinator | Studying a Master of Clinical Teaching |
1,529
Tweets
1,092
Following
1,312
Followers
Tweets
Adrian Cotterell 20h
Article suggests that students who are proficient in collaborative problem solving usually have strong content knowledge. So do Aussie classrooms need more collaboration or a greater emphasis on content-rich lessons?
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell 21h
Replying to @ZeinaChalich
Doesn’t this imply students ought to know lots of the subject’s content & skills so they can be proficient in collaborative problem solving?
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell 22h
Replying to @JohnKenny03
Do you guys currently follow a commercial program?
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell 22h
Replying to @JohnKenny03
How does this differ to the Jolly Phonics program?
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell Nov 21
Very true. The only people I generally unfollow on Twitter are people who post pictures of thier babies or pets. People ought to approach edu- Twitter differently.
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell Nov 19
Our vision statement is literally “Inspiring hearts, inspiring minds.” But inspiration can come in many forms. It also doesn’t have to be fixated on the short-term, but rather build over time.
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell Nov 19
What proof is there that they can’t?
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell Nov 19
Both
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell Nov 19
I have used it. I think its great for consolidation and connecting ideas. But half the class don't actually learn the concept if they haven't been introduced to it first. That is why I keep saying, explicit teaching for initial learning, inquiry for consolidation.
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell Nov 19
Why is it vital? I am not necessarily disagreeing. But can students still learn when they have limited agency?
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell Nov 19
The relevant research agrees with you because highly able students usually have a lot of relevant content knowledge to be able to draw on to solve foreign problems. But in your experience, how do students who struggle academically handle inquiry units?
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell Nov 19
Sometimes it only takes a student to understand what they are learning to create intrinsic curiosity & passion. Too often a lack of understanding is what causes poor self-efficacy which in turn negatively influences motivation.
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell Nov 19
Can you give me an example? Such as teaching students fractions or algebra?
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell Nov 19
Today I did a quick pretest on a new maths topic. I knew most of my Ss wouldn't have proficiency because my experience has shown me this. 5 Ss did. They got to work through the activity independently. The rest needed explicit instruction. It doesn't need to be complicated.
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell Nov 19
Can you see how your definition may cause some teachers to doubt if this methodology will work with domains such as Maths and Languages?
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell Nov 19
Can you point to something concrete to help me understand your definition of inquiry?
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell Nov 19
We all are I think. That’s why we are on Twitter on a Sunday night.
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell Nov 19
Lots of western children get to choose many things in life (sometimes too much). They are not disempowered when I say they need to learn something. As an adult, I know where the knowledge & skills can take them.
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell Nov 19
Replying to @gderry @MRsalakas
Bit of a presumption? Everything I’m reading atm states that we should make sure they have strong content knowledge first, then inquiry can consolidate learning.
Reply Retweet Like
Adrian Cotterell Nov 19
I have Geoff. I started my career emphasising inquiry models. When I delved into educational research, I had to change my mind and my practice.
Reply Retweet Like