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Adrian Cotterell
Teacher | Director of Studies F-12 | Studying a Master of Clinical Teaching |
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Adrian Cotterell retweeted
Dylan McConnell Dec 3
Time for a update! How rooftop solar has changed the November demand profile in South Australia over the past 7 years:
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Adrian Cotterell Dec 12
Students probably had a personal interest in these subjects? Don’t we want individuals to embrace their individual passions? Steve Jobs studied calligraphy.
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Adrian Cotterell retweeted
Alice Leung Dec 9
A thousands likes for this. Eg. formative assessment. You can’t have effective formative assessment without subject content knowledge.
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Adrian Cotterell Dec 10
Replying to @RaimondoNick
Looked at our recently implemented model of ability grouping. Additional extension Mathematics & English classes. It reduces class sizes for all, gives more scope to stretch highly able students but avoids having the contentious issues surrounding low ability groups.
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Adrian Cotterell Dec 9
The “something” is hopefully the best of which has been thought and said so that students can stand on the shoulders of giants and face the unknown future head on.
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Adrian Cotterell Dec 9
Let’s say those predictions are true even though the date seems to always change. The only way a human will compete is if they can critically/creatively think. The only way humans can do that is if they have a broad knowledge and understanding within multiple domains
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Adrian Cotterell Dec 9
Certainly room for this in schools. But I think those types of assessments would actually be better suited in the workplace when companies are training their staff. I believe that the purpose of primary/secondary education is much broader than simply getting a job.
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Adrian Cotterell Dec 9
Her ability to be able to “play the game” shows she has a better than average intelligence. Which was obviously nurtured by the education she received. By design, most people can’t get an ATAR of 99.
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Adrian Cotterell Dec 9
But spending time and energy in creating better exam items is a much better solution than simply removing exams.
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Adrian Cotterell Dec 9
Sure, I’m not saying only have exams. I’m all for other types of assessment types including teacher observations. But our society has benefited greatly because its citizens can communicate their knowledge through the written word.
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Adrian Cotterell Dec 9
Edu institutions are different to the rest of life though. Their whole function is to make sure students are learning something. Across academic disciplines, exams are an efficient/effective assessment type to ensure students can demonstrate they have learnt something.
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Adrian Cotterell Dec 9
How is the 21st century any different? We need more young people to have a broad knowledge base so they can be powerful critical and creative thinkers. They can then leverage the power of the internet so they can work across multiple domains.
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Adrian Cotterell Dec 9
This girl proves her own argument wrong. She obviously received a very good education to be able to articulate herself so well and have the desire to communicate her opinions in the public sphere. She’ll go far and her education has certainly helped.
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Adrian Cotterell Dec 9
Relevant content knowledge in long term memory is vital to assist students to be able to show genuine critical/creative thinking. Quality exams ensure students are learning this important knowledge and then independently apply their knowledge critically/creatively.
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Adrian Cotterell Dec 9
Sure. They can do that too. But if we are wanting a valid assessment, an exam is always going to be a more reliable measurement of a student’s capabilities.
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Adrian Cotterell Dec 9
If students have a broad/deep level of knowledge and understanding within a domain, they can certainly show critical thinking in a short period of time. That’s why grand masters can be very good and very fast at chess. Because of their superior knowledge stored in LTM.
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Adrian Cotterell Dec 9
Surely a student performing well at a well written exam can adequately demonstrate a student is competent within an academic domain. It’s obviously not everything to become successful. But removing them from academic subjects would bring more harm than good.
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Adrian Cotterell Dec 9
Why? Exam format is great for Essay writing and critical literacy?
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Adrian Cotterell Dec 9
Why? What’s wrong with them?
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Adrian Cotterell Dec 9
What’s wrong with them? For academic subjects, its a better form of assessment than some types of assignments that can be drafted multiple times by teachers/parents. I think its a great opportunity for Ss to independently demonstrate their knowledge, understanding and application
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