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Adrian Holliday
The politics, ideologies and discourses of the intercultural, English language education, English in the world, cultural imperialism, and qualitative research
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Adrian Holliday Sep 5
Replying to @adrianholliday
I think the opposite. It hugely strengthens the concept of colonisation by connecting it with our everyday lives.
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Adrian Holliday Sep 5
Replying to @neil_mcm
The Bhabha extract helps me work out my thinking. It might imply that not all stereotyping is part of the colonialist discourse. I think though that it is – that *all* of us are colonised *whenever* we are stereotyped. I need to think further what this means
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Adrian Holliday Sep 4
See my blog on stereotyping as colonisation
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Adrian Holliday Sep 1
See my new blog on cultural rhythms
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Adrian Holliday Aug 9
Replying to @muranava @TeflEquity
I think I agree with both of you. I support what Marek says in his blog and also agree with the point about linguistics. What are we arguing about?
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Adrian Holliday Aug 9
Replying to @TeflEquity @muranava
If we are looking for evidence of a discourse and the ideology it represents within a text, we can see it there between the lines. It speaks for itself. The author of the text is subscribing to the ideology even if they are not aware.
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Adrian Holliday Aug 9
Replying to @TeflEquity
The analysis in your blog indicates well the ubiquitous and apparently innocent professional discourse that supports native-speakerism. Not surprising. You cite bits and pieces; but they have sufficient resonance.
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Adrian Holliday Aug 8
Replying to @TeflEquity @muranava
A text is native-speakerist if it uses or refers to the native-non-native speaker labels without critiquing the politics of their use. Does it therefore follow that everything else that the text says is native-speakerist? This is an important question about how ideology works.
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Adrian Holliday Aug 8
Replying to @muranava @TeflEquity
Native-speakerism is an ideology that transcends the professional discourse and finds its way into many aspects of everyday life. The established ELT professional discourse is however a particularly vulnerable place for the ideology to settle.
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Adrian Holliday Aug 8
Replying to @muranava @TeflEquity
It’s a very powerful and persistent professional discourse
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Adrian Holliday Aug 8
Replying to @muranava @TeflEquity
So he seems to have got what authenticity is. It’s just the framing of language teaching as from ‘native speaker’ to ‘non-native speaker’ that’s all wrong – and which is therefore bound to pollute even the best notion of authenticity.
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Adrian Holliday Aug 8
Replying to @muranava @TeflEquity
Can you give me the link to Long so that I can see?
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Adrian Holliday Aug 8
Replying to @TeflEquity
They are not. This native-speakerist notion of authenticity seems so outdated. Widdowson has a much better idea. Attached are pages 104-5 from my Struggle to Teach English book.
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Adrian Holliday Jul 24
Seem my blog with an extract from my new edition of my book *Understanding intercultural communication: negotiating a grammar of culture*
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Adrian Holliday Jul 19
See my blog on how to get writing done
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Adrian Holliday Jul 2
Why does anyone have to “earn the ‘native speaker’ badge”? We have to get rid of the badge because it doesn’t help at all.
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Adrian Holliday Jul 2
We need to know what people do with language, not whether or not they fit an imagined ‘native speaker’ label.
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Adrian Holliday Jul 2
Why not just say what they are instead of trying to connect this with the ‘native speaker’ label? Trying to apply the label is the problem.
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Adrian Holliday Jul 2
Replying to @TeflEquity @ELGazette
On the one hand are ordinary people who happen to have acquired a particular language before a certain age. On the other hand is the ‘native speaker’ label that inappropriately constructs some people as ‘culturally special’. Disconnecting the two might help clarify our thoughts.
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Adrian Holliday Jun 29
Replying to @TeflEquity
Why, then, would we want to ask the question?
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