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Adrian Holliday
The politics, ideologies and discourses of the intercultural, English language education, English in the world, cultural imperialism, and qualitative research
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Adrian Holliday Jul 2
Why does anyone have to “earn the ‘native speaker’ badge”? We have to get rid of the badge because it doesn’t help at all.
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Adrian Holliday Jul 2
We need to know what people do with language, not whether or not they fit an imagined ‘native speaker’ label.
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Adrian Holliday Jul 2
Why not just say what they are instead of trying to connect this with the ‘native speaker’ label? Trying to apply the label is the problem.
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Adrian Holliday Jul 2
Replying to @TeflEquity @ELGazette
On the one hand are ordinary people who happen to have acquired a particular language before a certain age. On the other hand is the ‘native speaker’ label that inappropriately constructs some people as ‘culturally special’. Disconnecting the two might help clarify our thoughts.
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Adrian Holliday Jun 29
Replying to @TeflEquity
Why, then, would we want to ask the question?
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Adrian Holliday Jun 29
Replying to @TeflEquity
How can this question be asked? ‘Native speakers’ is in inverted commas because they are imagined and therefore don’t really exist. So the question really means ‘is the construction of “native speaker” associated with better pronunciation?’
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Adrian Holliday Apr 15
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Adrian Holliday Feb 6
See my blog on researching native-non-native speaker issues
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Adrian Holliday Feb 5
Replying to @MarekKiczkowiak
A very apt image. I seem to remember someone erroneously referring to people labelled as ‘non-native speakers’ as a separate ‘species’.
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Adrian Holliday Nov 26
I think the native-non-native speaker labels are irrevocably tainted
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Adrian Holliday Nov 25
I think it’s our duty as researchers and educators always to interrogate how we and others label each other
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Adrian Holliday Nov 24
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Adrian Holliday Nov 20
Taking all these points and thinking about them. Will write a blog very soon to try to address these questions. None of this is straightforward; but I stand by what I said.
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Adrian Holliday Aug 23
My blog – The location of argument and the connecting of sentences.
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Adrian Holliday 12 Jul 17
See my blog on not using using 'In my mind's eye'
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Adrian Holliday retweeted
IALIC Conference 19 Jun 17
Complex interculturalities of, between, surrounding and beyond the classroom
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Adrian Holliday 8 Jun 17
'... speaker' labels carry powerful professional and popular images. That’s why we think we know whey they are.
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Adrian Holliday 8 Jun 17
Only 'awkward evidence' because we're conditioned to see it. We teach people not so-labelled ‘non-native speakers’
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Adrian Holliday 7 Jun 17
Lots of so-labelled ‘native speakers' would not score 7. We don’t really know how to measure such things anyway
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Adrian Holliday retweeted
Language on the Move 6 May 17
Multilingua no longer even sends such 'research' out for review: flawed assumptions = desk rejection
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