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Adrian Holliday
The politics, ideologies and discourses of the intercultural, English language education, native-speakerism, cultural imperialism, and qualitative research
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Adrian Holliday Feb 7
Replying to @Hoeferle
It made me think a lot about why I didn’t like it
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Adrian Holliday Feb 6
Replying to @CultureMastery
Not to do with different cultures, but with the particular cultural experience of people who are experimented on and what claims can be made regarding other people
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Adrian Holliday Feb 6
Replying to @MarekKiczkowiak
It’s the wrong question. Not to do with being a ‘native speaker’, but with particular experience with particular language in particular environments.
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Adrian Holliday Feb 6
Replying to @Hoeferle
Sounds an odd question, as though a culture is a person. Though I guess it depends what you mean by a culture. I can imagine that in some groups of people – e.g. friendship, sports, work – a culture might have developed that makes people less trusting
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Adrian Holliday Jan 26
Not sure that ‘challenge’ is better than ‘shock’. They both come and go in different ways – shocking challenges, challenging shocks. It’s trying to put them into a measurable sequence to serve a training agenda – to represent a ‘competence’ learning sequence – that’s problematic
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Adrian Holliday Jan 26
You are right. There is a false neoliberal training agenda that some sort of ‘culturally competent’ assimilation or integration can be achieved so that culture shock is somehow ‘solved’. In reality, cultural negotiation, slipping in and out of degrees of shock is always there
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Adrian Holliday Jan 26
Relates to many encounters in lifelong small culture formation on the go. Also, adaptation should be creative, cultural innovation, or perhaps just walk away – as long as it’s for the right reasons near the end of the cycle when we have better knowledge of Self & Other prejudice
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Adrian Holliday Jan 22
Thank you Parisa
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Adrian Holliday Jan 21
Replying to @trannycita
This is excellent. Can you send the URL of the whole lecture?
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Adrian Holliday Jan 19
Replying to @Sietar_UK
Is this still commodifying cultural difference? Shouldn’t we just all be sensitive to each other’s values and behaviours wherever we find them? Perhaps that is what this does.
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Adrian Holliday Jan 16
I don’t think it’s concentric because there are multiple Centres, e.g. patriarchy and neoliberalism (perhaps native-speakerism, positivism, fundamentalism, methodological nationalism), that are variable in their configuration in different places
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Adrian Holliday Jan 16
Yes, absolutely, there is variability everywhere. Understanding this moves us well away from an idea of bounded national cultures that define all the people within them, and from a one-to-one equating of learning language and learning culture
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Adrian Holliday Jan 16
There are clearly national structures that bring us up differently. They imprint political boundaries on already shifting and hybrid cultural realities. Perhaps this is the Centre, containing imposition that ignores the margins and why we need to deCentre.
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Adrian Holliday Jan 16
My co-author says Bauman’s ‘liquid’ is too easy an adjective for culture. So we search again. Perhaps ‘unbounded, unstructured and hybrid’ – ‘around us wherever we go and shifting through small culture formation on the go’. So now how it relates to structure?
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Adrian Holliday Jan 15
We shouldn’t be afraid of clunky expressions if they make us and others think more about what we are saying. Our task as writers is to make them read better, rather than to give in to easy statements. Acronyms just reify discourses and inhibit critical thinking.
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Adrian Holliday Jan 14
Very good point. Hard to distinguish between cultural and . It might be that large culture boundaries dissolve and we think of always shifting small boundaries implicit in permanent hybridity. Structures remain but do not confine us.
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Adrian Holliday Jan 13
This Guardian article is now dated. Understanding & tolerance of ‘target cultures’ like ‘target languages’ maintains ‘us’-‘them’ boundaries. = everyday process of dissolving imagined boundaries, finding ourselves in others & vice versa
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Adrian Holliday Jan 13
Every opportunity to have researchers presenting and discussing in an academic community is good. We encourage displays of caution, struggles to find meaning and new ways of looking at data. We should collaborate with this.
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Adrian Holliday Jan 13
Yes. I guess the tricky thing is how to use this without encouraging racist cultural . It’s such a seductive set of images. Perhaps it would be good to help students to find ways to identify with rather than Other the images.
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Adrian Holliday Jan 13
But also a lot of the everything else could be other people’s theses and other things that inform understanding of your thesis. This is also why many supervisors like you to manage how they work with your thesis
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