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Kyle E. Mitchell Mar 11
My thesis is that that they will go even more closed as a result of the AWS announcement. Which is a large part of the cost that makes me suspect the overall outcome falls well short of optimal.
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adrian cockcroft Mar 11
Open Distro for ElasticSearch will gather more of the open source community faster if they do.
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Adam Jacob Mar 11
If what they do next is close themselves off to collaboration with the AWS fork, then the'll loose the moral high ground to being the upstream, and instead you might see the "true" upstream switch. That would be a tragedy for Elastic.
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adrian cockcroft Mar 11
It’s a distro not a fork.
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Adam Jacob Mar 11
It’s not carrying patch sets to keep compatible versions. It’s even distributing plugins for features not found in the upstream. I see you want it to be a distro, but if it was just that, why not use elastic-oss?
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adrian cockcroft Mar 11
Because although elastic-oss drops the features it still contains mingled code, and PRs contain mingled code. We had to build a clean licensed base distro.
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Joahn Maerk, the lost Stark cousin Mar 11
Replying to @adrianco @adamhjk and 2 others
then why play semantic games? If it's better and more respectful to the community, why not just call it a fork and give it a name?
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adrian cockcroft Mar 11
Replying to @johnmark @adamhjk and 2 others
There is no fork. It’s the pure Apache licensed subset of a release. It will track the same version numbers.
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Adam Jacob Mar 11
Replying to @_msw_ @adrianco and 3 others
Cause from here, you forked, released open source versions of their proprietary features, and called it by their name. You went for the throat. You had every right to, and might be justified in it, but man - you took the name, too.
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adrian cockcroft Mar 11
Replying to @adamhjk @_msw_ and 3 others
We already have the service with the same name.
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Joahn Maerk, the lost Stark cousin Mar 11
Replying to @adrianco @adamhjk and 3 others
I know you're a smart guy. You have to know how this looks from the outside, right? I can be convinced that all the outcomes were bad in some way, but I'm not convinced that this was least bad.
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adrian cockcroft
What should we have done instead, that Elastic would have agreed to? We have customers to support.
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Joahn Maerk, the lost Stark cousin Mar 11
Replying to @adrianco @adamhjk and 3 others
This implies that Elastic is OK with what you're doing, which is good to know. I can see now that you are threading the needle trying to do right by both your customers and Elastic. It's a tough spot to be in, and I applaud your trying to find a creative solution.
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inthecloud247 Mar 11
Y’all should’ve just worked out a licensing deal, and if needed, passed price increases onto customers. This fork is the nuclear option... another Oracle Linux. The community would be crazy to support this.
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adrian cockcroft Mar 12
Some of the largest users of ElasticSearch are not customers of Elastic, and don’t want to be. We have Netflix and Expedia willing to publicly support our distro.
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adrian cockcroft Mar 12
Replying to @johnmark @adamhjk and 3 others
It doesn’t imply that. They weren’t interested in collaborating and we did what we needed to do for our customers.
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msw Apr 9
From what I have seen so far, this is integration of the existing managed service run by Elastic such that it has console, billing, and service discovery. In other words: at the core, it is the existing service run by Elastic that was already available on AWS and GCP.
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Matt Asay Apr 9
I think that's true of MongoDB's service too
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Adam Jacob Apr 9
Replying to @_msw_ @mjasay and 5 others
Good marketing win, tho. ;)
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Matt Asay Apr 9
Replying to @adamhjk @_msw_ and 5 others
Sort of. Do we really think any serious enterprise buyer cares? I don’t. I spent nearly 20 years fighting the “proprietary lock-in” wars against the “evil” overlords of tech...as the Global 2000 kept buying :-)
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