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Adil Aijaz
Co-founder of
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Adil Aijaz Jun 25
Replying to @SplitSoftware
In most cases yes. However, I have worked in teams where thousands of engineers are committing to trunk. In that case, the test suite was broken into 'slow' and 'fast' where 'fast' ones were run on every commit, but 'slow' suite was run after accumulating a batch of changes
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Adil Aijaz Jun 23
Congratulations to , Mike Grinolds, and Matt Martin on this amazing milestone
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Adil Aijaz Jun 23
Replying to @adilaijaz
9/ As a Pakistani-American, I am afraid for both countries. For America, I am afraid that this nativist attitude will ruin our economy by the time our children enter the workforce. For Pakistan, I rue a generational chance being missed to invest in human capital and modernize
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Adil Aijaz Jun 23
Replying to @adilaijaz
8/ them to adapt to changes in macro environments; the biggest change being emergence of AI and its impact on how the world will work.
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Adil Aijaz Jun 23
Replying to @adilaijaz
7/ The key thing to remember for developing countries is that India or China didn't set out to become major players in AI. They became major players because they invested in their human capital; education of their population, improving their universities. This in turn allowed ..
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Adil Aijaz Jun 23
Replying to @adilaijaz
6/ While source countries often view this migration to U.S. as "brain drain", it has many benefits for source countries. Access to top tier universities, their research, their faculties, returning emigrants feeding local universities and startups are all benefits
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Adil Aijaz Jun 23
Replying to @adilaijaz
5/ Now for non-U.S. countries. Chinese, Indian, and Iranian contribution to this pool is very impressive. Especially Iran, given sanctions and political climate they live in.
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Adil Aijaz Jun 23
Replying to @adilaijaz
4/ however, this dominance shouldn't be taken for granted. As U.S. turns more nativist under Trump, talent will go elsewhere. Once a viable competitor for talent emerges, even if U.S. changes policy post trump, it might be too late to fight off competition and maintain the gap
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Adil Aijaz Jun 23
Replying to @adilaijaz
3/ this dominance has real implications on U.S. economy and GDP. It serves as a virtuous cycle. Having access to global talent pool, grows U.S. economy, widens the technology gap with competitors, and in turn makes U.S. and even more attractive home for global talent
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Adil Aijaz Jun 23
Replying to @adilaijaz
2/ US dominance in AI is not an accident. It comes from having a dominant economy, history of government funding, open-mindedness on immigration, a somewhat melting pot society, liberal university environments, and the language of global communication
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Adil Aijaz Jun 23
A great read on global AI talent pool, courtesy of my friend Sherry Shah. Some thoughts: 1/ Trump's effort to put restrictions on h1-b and high skilled immigration should be viewed in light of this data.
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Adil Aijaz May 20
Replying to @ph1
this localizes the pain to the person creating the flag. Flag expiration is also a good idea but like anything else, it does not enforce good behavior, it just suggests good behavior. Flag debt is a tragedy of commons; to solve it, the actor creating the flag should feel pain
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Adil Aijaz May 20
Replying to @ph1
I think this is key. If you establish flag ownership - both in the tool and the culture - then the most effective approach in my mind is to limit the # of flags a single owner can have out there at any time. Say put a limit of 10. To add an 11th, you are forced to remove one
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Adil Aijaz retweeted
Split Apr 29
It's not me. It's you. by
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Adil Aijaz retweeted
EricaJoy Mar 12
dear leaders with newly WFH employees: 1. it is a pandemic out here. don't expect employees to be working at normal productivity levels, but do trust employees to work at the productivity level they are capable of. 2. if someone says "we should track employees," refer to #1.
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Adil Aijaz Mar 13
Replying to @pbrane
the fact that we have this much poverty in the richest country in the world. Where if a kid doesn't go to school, he / she is at risk of going hungry.
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Adil Aijaz Mar 12
Replying to @adilaijaz
It reminds me of an observation by Jason Kottke: "America is a rich country that feels like a poor country."
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Adil Aijaz Mar 12
Replying to @adilaijaz
How is this a thing in the richest country in the world? If this doesn't cause you outrage, what will?
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Adil Aijaz Mar 12
"officials in the District of Columbia are weighing the possible benefits of school closures with the reality that many low-income families rely on school-based free breakfast and lunch to meet their kids’ nutritional needs." How is this acceptable?
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Adil Aijaz Mar 11
Replying to @adilaijaz
All my best wishes to engineering teams at these companies. You're doing one heck of a job!
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