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David Baker
Web consultant / entrepreneur, Ember.js Core - Learning Team, product craftsman, devoted husband, follower of Jesus
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David Baker Apr 19
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David Baker retweeted
Eric Meyer Apr 8
“Spacer dot gif, you say? Spacer… dot gif.” (takes slow drag on cigarette) “Now there’s a name I haven’t heard in… a long, long time.” (saxophone wails noirishly)
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David Baker Apr 6
A lovely read about the thought, care and attention to detail put into the Apple Card
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David Baker Apr 1
Replying to @wycats
Oh really? Think I’ll need to take a closer look then
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David Baker Mar 31
Replying to @baaz @horse_js
Nay
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David Baker Mar 31
For Ember’s classic components that’s indeed correct. Thankfully, Ember’s Glimmer (or Octane) components are *much* shallower
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David Baker Mar 30
Replying to @15lettermax
You’re dealing with cross-state headaches, right? Can see that not being fun ...
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David Baker Mar 30
Replying to @15lettermax
you too? That's been a good chunk of my morning
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David Baker Mar 30
And a bundler written in Rust and compiled down to WASM May in the long run allow auto-optimization of the JS per browser and delivered to at the edge of a CDN. Ambitions ...
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David Baker Mar 30
which in turn enables use of Webpack, Parcel or future improved bundlers in a pluggable manner. The goal is for a bundler to be something that the ecosystem can replace if something better comes along without breaking the community at that point
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David Baker Mar 30
use of ES6 imports directly has allowed for code splitting. Under the hood, although Ember’s apis now *look* like ES6 there has been a fair bit of flexibility allowed from the early days of Ember. The repo linked to above helps add the needed rigour to the greater Ember ecosystem
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David Baker Mar 30
It’s a tad mir complicated than that (I’ve got a mini blog post that I’ve been working on that explains this). Basically though, the reason Ember hasn’t used webpack or another bundler has been because of Ember’s heavy use of a dependency injection system under the hood. React’s
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David Baker Mar 30
Sure, improving the messaging and more fun chats sounds good to me! 😉
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David Baker Mar 30
Oh, old apps have to do work to upgrade, trust me. But the goal is to allow apps to upgrade without “community breaking” changes such as have happened in the Python 2 -> 3 or Angular 1 -> 2 transitions. Because it’s those types of changes that can permanently damage an ecosystem
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David Baker Mar 30
that the community values so highly (by allowing stability and a smooth upgrade path) also comes with constraints that take careful planning. But from what I see, getting to this point has been part of the larger vision for the last 6-7 years. It’s fun to see the vision unfold
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David Baker Mar 30
That’s correct. Architecturally Ember’s been well built to handle route code splitting for years. But under the hood, the framework/ecosystem has been working hard to reduce some of Ember’s runtime flexibility that has prevented code splitting. The beauty of “no app left behind”
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David Baker Mar 30
I’ve generally recommended to smaller clients that they avoid prematurely splitting like this if the only reason they were considering engines was the lazy loading aspect, so would love to know if I’m missing something
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David Baker Mar 30
Replying to @eaf4
Indeed. Do you aim to make dynamic imports at the component level an option as well or is that something you aim to wait on while things shake out?
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David Baker Mar 30
But is the usecase for engines *this* or is it to allow independent teams to ship while ensuring they aren’t broken by other teams? For a small company, the added ceremony around working with engines doesn’t seem worth the cost once lazy loading at route boundaries is possible...
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David Baker Mar 29
So code splitting on routes in Ember is still quite experimental and the usual caveats apply (freshly written code, could cause problems with links between routes that assume default query parameters), but I’m quite looking forward to experimenting with this
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