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Aaron Parecki
How did we let the Web get to this point. All I wanted to do was read this blog post.
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Johannes Ernst Jan 11
Replying to @aaronpk @Medium
That’s perhaps because is less and less part of the web.
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🦁Bōggie Jan 11
Replying to @aaronpk
Exactly.
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Paul Anthony Williams 🎺 Jan 11
Replying to @aaronpk
Guessing from the header image... was, ironically, the article about Google surveillance?
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Nick Cummings Jan 11
Replying to @aaronpk
Yikes 😬
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Aaron Parecki Jan 11
Replying to @PaulAntWilliams
Yes
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Paul Anthony Williams 🎺 Jan 11
Replying to @aaronpk
Excellent 🙈
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Not Fake Adam Kalsey Jan 11
Replying to @aaronpk
Imagine what it would look like in Europe with the GDPR consent banners on there, too.
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Christian Hockenberger Jan 12
Replying to @akalsey @aaronpk
Consent banner looks like this, but idk why there is no sign in with google...
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Lisamusing Jan 12
Replying to @aaronpk
Agreed. Overstepping the boundaries of the readers has the effect of censoring the authors, sometimes.
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Hugo Bessa 🌿 Jan 12
Replying to @aaronpk
I usually just tap that reader button because most websites are pure design garbage
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Ronald Vermeij Jan 12
Replying to @aaronpk @kornelski
"The only thing for evil to prevail, is for good persons doing nothing (against it)" This Planet needs a SECOND / backup fully decentrailzed INTER-MESH by the people for the people to empower everyone
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kornel@mastodon.social Jan 12
Replying to @RonaldVermeij @aaronpk
I fall to see how a publisher choosing to put crap on their own website has anything to do with the delivery method of said crap.
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Cezar Pokorski Jan 12
Replying to @aaronpk @kornelski
Surprised to see actual content on the screen. It's usually covered by cookie agreements (two, each introduced by a different law).
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Ronald Vermeij Jan 12
Replying to @kornelski @aaronpk
Don't worry now, 1 day you will understand it too. Here are a few clues to get you started with your search about the true nature behind this incident, Why - in the future - every / website user will be mandatory required to "log in" to almost all internet platforms.
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Trevor Dorsey Jan 12
We bought the lie that we didn’t have to pay for it. What if brands/pros on and paid a few dollars a month for features? Or we paid $10 a year for email hosting? Companies could have still been profitable without selling out their “customers” to advertisers.
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Ishan Jain Jan 12
Replying to @aaronpk @kornelski
off-tangent. Google auto-prompting users to login to websites that use google login is single handedly one of the reasons I'll never for the life of me be a user of their browser. It's annoying, intrusive and baffling that someone thought "oh, this sounds like a good idea".
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Veronica Gillas Jan 12
Replying to @aaronpk @Medium
I saw that too, so I stopped using altogether.
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John Evdemon Jan 12
Replying to @aaronpk
this is one of many reasons we need
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Steve Rowling Jan 28
Replying to @aaronpk @jensimmons
Reader mode on mobile Safari is a great way to avoid all this rubbish.
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