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Jesse Anderson 5 Dec 18
For those reading this thread and wondering what the fuss is all about, I wrote a post that attempts to summarize the issue as neutrally as possible .
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Ross Gardler 6 Dec 18
You say "The motivator to give back to open source projects is more of a moral or social contract." I say "nope". The motivator for businesses is purely economic. It's expensive to maintain a fork, so as long as the project is innovating contributions will flow.
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Jesse Anderson 6 Dec 18
I'm not really talking about forking in this section. More about the motivation for a business to contribute back to open source or not.
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adrian cockcroft 6 Dec 18
The motivation for AWS to do anything is primarily customer demand. Once we know what customers want we can figure out how to fund that and get the work done efficiently.
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Matt Asay 6 Dec 18
But I do think customers *do* care about AWS' ability to meet their requirements, which comes from influencing code direction on open source projects. That's why I think AWS will have to/want to do more, and not from any public shaming.
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adrian cockcroft 6 Dec 18
Customers use more open source and care more about contributions now than they did a few years ago, which is the underlying reason why AWS is building more open source based products and contributing more now.
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Dor Laor 6 Dec 18
Replying to @adrianco @mjasay and 10 others
That's true, you're doing more but the feedback you're getting is that it's not enough. The world's largest platform needs to be a leader here, similar to the transition MSFT has made. It will actually be positive for your business as it will defuse lock-in and monopoly fears
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Dor Laor 6 Dec 18
Replying to @adrianco @mjasay and 10 others
Best lock-in is value lock-in. With the massive amount of services, amazing integration and access to the best hardware in the world, being *the* benevolent giant will pay back big time. If I were you, I'd have a OSS strategy per every major service.
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adrian cockcroft 6 Dec 18
Replying to @DorLaor @mjasay and 10 others
We do, but service teams work independently, and situations and strategies are different and at different levels of maturity. My open source team acts as consultants internally.
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Matthew S. Wilson
Take Firecracker as a case study: the case to engage others outside of the internal Lambda and Fargate teams through open collaboration and open source was made by the builders of the technology and their internal customers, not 's team (who are awesome partners in this)
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Matthew S. Wilson 6 Dec 18
, as a partner and customer are there projects or technology areas where you would like to see more investment or collaboration? We have a huge backlog of customer asks, and to do open source *right* you have to allocate team resources that could be used in other ways.
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Tyler James Johnson 6 Dec 18
Replying to @_msw_ @adrianco and 12 others
Using the open ecosystem approach for building tech and recruiting talent has been very effective for big tech, much more difficult for the rest of us though, although we can at least ride the coattails.
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ahw: pdx 6 Dec 18
Replying to @Tyler_J_J @_msw_ and 13 others
It is reminiscent of the 1990s when software vendors were at a significant disadvantage to dominant players who fought open source movements. Today, small software vendors now face AWS who act upon what "customers want" and use OS for competitive advantage.
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rodric 6 Dec 18
Replying to @_msw_ @adrianco and 13 others
Another point of view by published earlier is worth reading.
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