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Ryan Yurkanin
Engineer 🧠 average tech blogger and lover of Dark Souls 🌞 he/him
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Ryan Yurkanin Nov 1
Replying to @crswll
Don't read too much about Tickled its definitely an insane ride
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Ryan Yurkanin Nov 1
Replying to @crswll
Have you seen Tickled?
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Ryan Yurkanin Oct 30
Meant to write some code tonight, ended up jamming to dancing queen
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Ryan Yurkanin Oct 26
Replying to @wesbos @scottjehl
dropoff at city hall in philadelphia took me 2 hours last friday :(
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Ryan Yurkanin Oct 26
Josh is one of those developers that busts out demos and examples that challenge your view of what's possible in web dev Highly recommend following them, and paying attention to this if you're interested in honing your CSS skills
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Ryan Yurkanin Oct 25
Replying to @pauljstales
But what do you do when it's only available for in store purchase and the websites always wrong about having them in stock?! 😭
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Ryan Yurkanin Oct 25
yea programming is hard but have you ever tried to figure out if a Target has something you need in stock?
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Ryan Yurkanin Oct 23
Replying to @YurkaninRyan
1. Take a guess and tweak one part of the code 2. Make a PR and push a commit up to it 3. Wait 20 minutes to see if my tweak did what I want 4. 98% of the time it definitely doesn't 5. Repeat steps 1 till 4 until I figure it out and my PR is a shameful mess 😭
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Ryan Yurkanin Oct 23
Going between frontend work and CI/CD is such an odd shift. With all the tooling in the frontend world the dev cycle feels so snappy and intuitive. With CI/CD Pipeline Building it feels so slow and error prone Maybe I just suck at CI/CD work
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Ryan Yurkanin Oct 23
Replying to @YurkaninRyan
One weird thing you may see about Generics is that sometimes developers will use one letter names for them. I never really got this though as we don't use one letter variables for functions! function unreadable<T,X,G>(a: T, b: X, c: G): T | X | G Dont be intimidated by that πŸ˜…
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Ryan Yurkanin Oct 23
Replying to @YurkaninRyan
A very simple use case for this would be type relationships in a function. Say for example, you wanted a function to take in any type and return that same exact type. function same<Type>(x: Type): Type { return x; } const x: number = same<FormData>(form) β¬… TypeError!
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Ryan Yurkanin Oct 23
Have you been confused by this Typescript syntax? useState<FormData>(); It's called a Generic and you can think of them like type arguments for a function πŸš€
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Ryan Yurkanin Oct 10
Replying to @domitriusclark
What's nice with it is you can take it reaaaal slow. Like don't even write any typescript just let it catch mistakes and add to typescript code as you get comfortable!
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Ryan Yurkanin Oct 7
Replying to @mgreiler @HanisahKZ
If your PRs have a lot of comments that are nits I think that's a bad sign If your PRs don't have comments and your not asking questions that may also be bad because you're missing out on a great learning opportunity
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Ryan Yurkanin Oct 6
Replying to @xirclebox
Hope it turns out good! I've never cooked with it myself but I've been curious
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Ryan Yurkanin retweeted
Paul J Stales πŸ§‘πŸ»β€πŸ’» Sep 30
Hey friends, I have a short tutorial on a cool / concept πŸ”₯ web workers πŸ”₯! If you are a , know some , doing , , or just want to see something cool, here: full post here: !
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Ryan Yurkanin Sep 16
Replying to @rickhanlonii
i hope one day my git contributions ascend from pitiful 2d to amazing 3d
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Ryan Yurkanin Aug 13
Replying to @xirclebox
good lord i'm calling the police
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Ryan Yurkanin Jul 15
Replying to @cliftonC76
Yeah so adding a way to inspect the end result of calling the function rather than the function itself is probably the easiest way to go
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Ryan Yurkanin Jul 15
Replying to @cliftonC76
If onSaveForm makes an API call you could use something that like fetch-mock that will allow you to inspect that it is being hit after some interaction with the component. You could also pull it out of the component body and pass in everything it needs as arguments.
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