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Yosemite National Park
National Park Service's primary source for news and information from Yosemite National Park.
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Yosemite National Park 3h
Even apparently calm water can carry hidden dangers. Emerald Pool (just above Vernal Fall) is infamous for its swift currents and sharp rocks hidden just below the surface. Read our latest Search and Rescue blog post about a tragedy averted this July:
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Yosemite National Park 8h
Replying to @AbadyX5
Check out the info about lodging, tours, and ranger-led programs on our website!
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Yosemite National Park Oct 19
What is a pluton? Geologists use this funky word to refer to a mass of rock formed from molten magma that has solidified over millions of years below the surface of the earth. As plutons were carved away by rivers and glaciers, they formed the landscape known today as Yosemite.
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Yosemite National Park Oct 17
Where is your favorite spot in Yosemite to watch the sunset? Ready...go!
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Yosemite National Park Oct 17
Replying to @AlexMcLean11
No, those campgrounds closed on October 15. You can view the opening and closing dates of campgrounds on our website:
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Yosemite National Park Oct 16
Yosemite is known for its granite–steep valley walls, mountain peaks, towering spires, and spectacular domes. But sometimes clouds descend and obscure familiar views. Can you name these Yosemite landmarks hidden in the clouds?
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Yosemite National Park Oct 15
Replying to @JennyDrew29
That would be a question for the park's concessionaire, Yosemite Hospitality. You can contact them on their website () or view some of their products online:
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Yosemite National Park Oct 15
Replying to @WayneGarciaKPTV
Yes, many deciduous trees in Yosemite Valley are changing color for fall.
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Yosemite National Park Oct 14
Replying to @YosemiteNPS
Yosemite's current glaciers will probably disappear within a decade or two, marking the end of a rich history of glacial research. What else will we have lost when a glacier is merely an idea? Watch our Instagram story to learn more! 4/4
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Yosemite National Park Oct 14
Replying to @YosemiteNPS
Overall, the Lyell Glacier has lost nearly 80% of its surface area since the days of Muir and Clark. In 2012, scientists discovered that the Lyell Glacier had thinned to a point where it was no longer moving, meaning it is technically no longer a glacier. 3/4
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Yosemite National Park Oct 14
Replying to @YosemiteNPS
John Muir and Galen Clark first measured these glaciers in 1872, and NPS scientists conduct monitoring every fall. That may soon change, however. This recent photo shows the west lobe of the Lyell Glacier, compared to a historic photo taken in 1903 from the same location. 2/4
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Yosemite National Park Oct 14
The landscape of Yosemite is the result of glacial erosion from multiple glacial periods over the past several million years. Small glaciers from the most recent glacial period currently still exist on the slopes of Mount Lyell and Mount Maclure. 1/4
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Yosemite National Park Oct 14
Replying to @Kayla_Laird
Service animals are allowed in park facilities and on shuttle buses and trams if they meet the legal definition of a service animal found at . Emotional support animals cannot go into the same areas as service animals.
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Yosemite National Park Oct 13
Replying to @YosemiteNPS
Wright was able to interview Totuya (Maria Lebrado), the granddaughter of Chief Tenaya and the last known survivor of the expulsion of the Ahwahneechee from Yosemite Valley in 1851. Speaking Spanish, Wright helped interpret her story when she returned in Yosemite in 1929. 3/3
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Yosemite National Park Oct 13
Replying to @YosemiteNPS
George Wright worked as an assistant naturalist here in the 1920s where he became concerned with wildlife issues in the park. He funded a groundbreaking survey of wildlife & plant conditions in national parks and became the first chief of the Wildlife Division of the NPS. 2/3
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Yosemite National Park Oct 13
In honor of , we want to acknowledge the lasting contributions George Wright made to Yosemite and the entire National Park Service. Follow this thread to learn more. 1/3
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Yosemite National Park retweeted
Yosemite Conservancy Oct 13
Whether you're an avid climber, or just curious about how people scale granite walls, 's "Ask a Climber" program serves up plenty of answers to climbing-related questions. Head to our blog to read a few FAQs: (📷: NPS/Eric Bissell)
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Yosemite National Park Oct 11
Replying to @jameszale
You can call 209/372-0266 to check status. The system we were using for the web was unreliable, so we stopped using. Sorry for the inconvenience.
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Yosemite National Park Oct 10
Let us help put a smile on your face today by reminding you of what a lovely autumn morning in Yosemite Valley looks like. What else about Yosemite makes you smile?
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Yosemite National Park Oct 9
The latest post on our Search and Rescue Blog is about a hiker who became separated from his group and got lost. Read the full report for tips on recreating with medical conditions, hiking preparedness, and hiking in a group:
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