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Wolwedans Namibia
Wolwedans,more than a collection of camps; our ethos lies in sustainable tourism, investment in our employees & commitment to conservation
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Wolwedans Namibia 13h
“The world is big, and I want to get a good look at it before it gets dark.” - John Muir
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Wolwedans Namibia May 17
Thanks for sharing your photo of Wolwedans, ! We love seeing our guests' favourite moments at Wolwedans. If you would like us to feature your photo next, simply tag us in your pic.
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Wolwedans Namibia May 16
A not uncommon sight here at Wolwedans, where we live close to nature and all her graceful occupants.
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Wolwedans Namibia May 15
We don't think there is a more breathtaking bathroom anywhere in the world. Photo Credit:
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Wolwedans Namibia May 14
The evocative calls of masses of Namaqua Sandgrouse flocking at a waterhole is one of the most quintessential, charismatic sounds of the Namib Desert. From: A Guidebook to the NamibRand Nature Reserve.
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Wolwedans Namibia May 13
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Wolwedans Namibia May 11
We have been very privileged to have hosted some of the most romantic weddings here at Wolwedans. Would you like to say your I Do's at Wolwedans? Click the link to find out more:
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Wolwedans Namibia May 10
Thanks for sharing your photo of Wolwedans, ! We love seeing our guests' favourite moments at Wolwedans. If you would like us to feature your photo next, simply tag us in your pic.
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Wolwedans Namibia May 9
Take a walk on the wild side with a Wolwedans guide as they take you around the reserve, showing you all the little critters and phenomena and teaching you about their value and importance.
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Wolwedans Namibia May 8
When this is the view to wake up for, the day can only get better and better. Photo credit:
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Wolwedans Namibia May 7
The Secretarybird is frequently seen striding through open habitats, usually in pairs but sometimes in larger groups. This long-legged species is also well adapted to catching snakes and other reptiles as prey, trampling them with its strong feet.
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Wolwedans Namibia May 6
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Wolwedans Namibia May 4
NamibRand Nature Reserve is Africa's only International Dark Sky Reserve. We are proud to be a part of a conservation program that doesn't only look at protecting the ground beneath our feet, but the sky above our heads.
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Wolwedans Namibia May 3
Thanks for sharing your photo of Wolwedans, ! We love seeing our guests' favourite moments at Wolwedans. If you would like us to feature your photo next, simply tag us in your pic.
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Wolwedans Namibia May 2
Five of Namibia’s 16 endemic or near-endemic bird species are found on the Reserve. The Dune Lark is a true endemic. The White-tailed Shrike, Rockrunner and Herero Chat are all Namibian near-endemics. (Extract from A Guidebook to the NamibRand Nature Reserve.)
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Wolwedans Namibia May 2
Frost is a regular occurrence in the NamibRand in winter, and snow was recorded on the mountains in August 1997 and August 2011. (Extract from A Guidebook to the NamibRand Nature Reserve.)
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Wolwedans Namibia May 2
In the desert, invertebrates are exactly where it is the hottest: at ground zero. To find relief, they need to get away from the surface, and a climb of a mere 2-3 cm will get them to a still hot, but no longer lethal, zone.
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Wolwedans Namibia May 1
Mouth-wateringly delicious meals at Wolwedans are made fresh from our vegetable and herb gardens.
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Wolwedans Namibia Apr 30
Many desert plants rely on wind dispersal. The hoodia seed pod splits open so that the winged seeds explode outwards. Each seed is crowned with a tuft of silky hairs, like a feathery parachute.
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Wolwedans Namibia Apr 29
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