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Wolfie Christl
Facebook's recently published patent suggests segregating users into 'working class, middle class, upper class' based on e.g.: - time spent using the internet per day - internet connection speed - distance from household to work office - data on other users in the same household
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Wolfie Christl 5 Feb 18
Replying to @WolfieChristl
The full patent text contains many other interesting details. It provides a good description of the basic functionality of Facebook's platform & user profile data. The news feed is called 'content generator':
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Wolfie Christl 5 Feb 18
Replying to @WolfieChristl
How can Facebook learn about something like 'commute time', 'distance from household to work office' or 'mode of transportation to work office'? Location data from its mobile apps
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Wolfie Christl 5 Feb 18
Replying to @WolfieChristl
How can FB learn about the 'types of household appliances owned', 'vehicles owned', 'size of house in square feet' or even about 'information about other users in the same household'? Perhaps by getting it from consumer data brokers like Acxiom or Oracle:
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Wolfie Christl 5 Feb 18
Replying to @WolfieChristl
Of course, the history of digital 'social sorting' ranges back to database marketing & consumer segmentation systems of the 1980s. But in recent years, the traditional consumer data industry (including credit reporting agencies) has joined forces with adtech & platform giants.
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A. Christoffersen 6 Feb 18
Replying to @WolfieChristl
Link for said patent?
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Wolfie Christl 6 Feb 18
Replying to @andreas_io
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Chris Vickery 5 Feb 18
Replying to @WolfieChristl
This is all extremely do-able. I've already come across the necessary databases to cross compile into this functionality.
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LucasCoug 5 Feb 18
It’s pretty simple. All you need is a) a universal login ID, like a phone number, cc or email address, or, less accurately, b) an IP address
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Ella Taylor-Smith 6 Feb 18
Replying to @WolfieChristl
Surely easier to train AI to judge your social class by your food pics?
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Andrew Rummer 7 Feb 18
Replying to @WolfieChristl
(British) upper class presumably: - don't have the internet - don't travel to work because they don't work - any other users in the household are servants
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