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Michel Lara
Father & Husband-Advocate for Liberty-Classicist aficionado-History/ Art/ Literature. A philosopher-poet intend on seizing the fleeting fictions of our lives...
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Michel Lara 2h
Replying to @VeraCausa9
In the above haiku, I tried to capture Mujo, a Zen term meaning "not forever" or the state of impermanence of all things. That's why, as every journey ends so the autumn rain & its distinctive smell won't last [2]
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Michel Lara 2h
Replying to @VeraCausa9
Takahashi Hiroaki- Red Temple, 1930 woodblock print [1]
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Michel Lara 2h
Journey's end- smell of autumn rain in straw hat.
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Michel Lara 7h
Replying to @VeraCausa9
This haiku was written by Basho after an autumn windstorm, 1684-94 It denotes the oneness of experience (physical & emotional) between the chrysanthemum and the poet as both have survived the storm [2]
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Michel Lara 7h
Replying to @VeraCausa9
Keika Hasegawa- Chrysanthemum from the "One hundred Chrysanthemums" series, 1893 woodblock print [1]
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Michel Lara 7h
I'm touched by this chrysanthemum it weathered the typhoon. -Basho
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Michel Lara 16h
Replying to @VeraCausa9
Takahashi Hiroaki (Shôtei) Izumi Bridge in Rain (Izumi-bashi no ame) about 1932, woodblock print [1]
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Michel Lara 16h
Typhoon rain darkness falls- battered hearts.
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Michel Lara 23h
Replying to @wesinjapan
Wonderful sight, thanks for sharing
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Michel Lara 23h
Replying to @VeraCausa9
P.S. I'm writing a thread on the timelessness of Basho's poetry. I'll post it in the near future. As always thank you all for reading [2]
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Michel Lara 23h
Replying to @VeraCausa9
Matsuo Basho (1644-1694) is indisputably the most famous Japanese poet. A master of Haiku who took it to the level of art. His Zen training changed the essence of haiku, from humorous to the beauty of nature, solitude & transience of life. [1]
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Michel Lara 23h
Replying to @VeraCausa9
In this simple but profound haiku, Basho encounters the timeless beauty of a mountain. A sudden transformative experience that both stills time & rejuvenates old age.
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Michel Lara 23h
Replying to @VeraCausa9
Ki no Tsurayuki (872-945) was a Japanese author, poet and courtier. He wrote the kana (Japanese) preface to the Kokin Wakashū waka anthology, which is considered the first masterpiece of Japanese prose. He is counted as one of the Thirty-six Poetry Immortals [1]
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Michel Lara 24h
Replying to @VeraCausa9
In this evocative poem, the unseen sorrowful call of a bird carries an unwanted memory, also awakening in the poet Ki no Tsurayuki, a memory that is better forgotten.
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Michel Lara 24h
Replying to @VeraCausa9
Ono no Komachi lived 834-880. She served at the imperial court, her beauty was legendary but she is supposed to have lost her beauty in old age and become a homeless beggar. Komachi is today a synonym for feminine beauty in Japan. She's one of the Thirty-six Poetry Immortals.[1]
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Michel Lara Oct 12
A short thread on three old Japanese poems meditating on time, memories, old age & sorrow. Ono no Komachi sees herself in the ancient pine tree bowed-down with memories. Her Buddhist empathy not only embraces the sorrows of the ancient pine tree but all sentient beings.
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Michel Lara Oct 11
Replying to @DoraBro48052347
That's very kind, thank you for reading
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Michel Lara Oct 11
Replying to @VeraCausa9
P.S. Here you can re-watch Marlon Brando as Mark Antony delivering his marvelous Shakespearean speech- Enjoy!
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Michel Lara Oct 11
Replying to @VeraCausa9
If you enjoyed this thread on the Classical Ars Rhetorica, I highly recommend you this great book, "A Handlist of Rhetorical Terms."
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Michel Lara Oct 11
Replying to @VeraCausa9
Detail of Cicerone statue in front of the Palace of Justice [Palazzo di Giustizia] , Roma. [1]
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