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US National Archives
The nation's record keeper. Follow us for live tweeting of events, two-way conversations, and help with questions.
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US National Archives 1h
Want to help make history more accessible? We're looking for a few good to transcribe and tag documents in our online Catalog! Getting started is easy!
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US National Archives 2h
The latest Virtual Programs newsletter is out! We've got reindeer heads, War of 1812 pension files, and a challenge transcribe records from the Tennessee Valley Authority! Read it here:
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US National Archives 3h
Lots of great online resources here for parents and educators of 5th through 8th graders! ⚡️ “ April 7, 2020”
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US National Archives 3h
Thanks for joining us for ! You can find all of these resources at & . We’ll see you again next week! If you have a topic that you would like us to explore, please let us know!
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US National Archives 4h
Teachers and parents, any questions for our education specialists?
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US National Archives 4h
Replying to @DocsTeach
And if you want to make or adapt your own activities on , over the next few weeks we're hosting webinars to walk you through doing this!
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US National Archives 4h
Replying to @USNatArchives
One helpful hint: if you're searching for upper elementary or middle school activities, you might find that activities listed at a grade level below or above can be quickly adapted to work with your students.
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US National Archives 4h
Replying to @DocsTeach
On , we've even put together a list of activities for middle school civics: and middle school US history: . Or you can search for yourself at:
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US National Archives 4h
Replying to @DocsTeach @ArchivesNYC
The best part is that is was cashed! You can see where the bank stamped it on the back.
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US National Archives 4h
Check out our lists of resources for middle school age students at and elementary students at
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US National Archives 4h
Another great resource for parents and educators!
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US National Archives 4h
Replying to @USNatArchives
You might find a historical map or aerial photograph of your state or major metropolitan area that can clearly help students compare & contrast the past to the present. 📷 , 1920
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US National Archives 4h
Replying to @USNatArchives
On the other side of the country, search and see the check that purchased Alaska and images of Alaskan native communities. There's even a teaching activity:
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US National Archives 4h
Replying to @USNatArchives
Just type in the name of your state or major city at to see what documents are available. For example, searching for New Jersey brings nearly 400 results on topics such as the American Revolution, immigration & national parks.
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US National Archives 4h
Even though we're the "National" Archives, we have lots of that tell stories about local & state history as well – a frequent focus in upper elementary grades across the country (especially 4th grade!) 📷
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US National Archives 4h
Replying to @USNatArchives
Our Document Analysis Worksheets at help students work with of a variety of types. They're the building blocks of the historical analysis process. Depending on your students, use either the novice or intermediate version.
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US National Archives 4h
Replying to @USNatArchives
If you have coming up, there are detailed maps, secession documents, and resignation letters. Search for these terms at or use filters like Civil War and Poster to see broadsides:
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US National Archives 4h
Replying to @USNatArchives
DocsTeach has thousands of , many appropriate for upper elementary & middle school students to explore. Just search topics you're teaching in the upcoming weeks at What topics are you teaching in your classes?
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US National Archives 4h
When we're working with younger elementary students, we usually focus on visual primary sources, like photographs or posters. Once students are older, however, you can start introducing more written documents into the mix.
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US National Archives 4h
For this week's Twitter chat, we’re focusing on resources appropriate for middle school and upper elementary students (around grades 4-8) from the National Archives. Questions? Ask us--our educators are standing by!
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