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U of M Emergency Med
University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Emergency Medicine official twitter account.
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U of M Emergency Med 20h
Read the latest Educational Pearl on Use of N-Acetylcysteine for non-acetaminophen acute liver failure at
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U of M Emergency Med Oct 16
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U of M Emergency Med Oct 16
Read the latest Educational Pearl on Labial adhesions at
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U of M Emergency Med Oct 15
Read the latest Educational Pearl on Co-ingestion of dihydropyridine with ARBs/ACEIs can cause more significant hypotension at
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bouchra reggad Oct 14
Excellente conférence thanks you all
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U of M Emergency Med Oct 14
Read the latest Educational Pearl on Central vs. Peripheral Nervous System Lesions – A Summary of Clinical Findings at
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Natalia Osipchuk Oct 14
Thank you to and the rest of the team for a wonderful and very educational The Crashing Patient conference!
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Dr. Danya Khoujah Oct 14
Normal ♥️ wall motion = thickening & thinning of myocardium Abnormal ♥️ wall motion is the FIRST clinical sign of infarction Caveats: old lesions, underlying LV dysfunction
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Dr. Danya Khoujah Oct 14
Why are we missing ACS? --> over-reliance on troponin --> not using the scoring for low-risk CP correctly
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Dr. Danya Khoujah Oct 14
Why are we missing ACS? --> atypical presentation SOB fatigue sleep disturbance upper abd pain
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Leen Alblaihed Oct 14
when r/o epidural abscess, image the ENTIRE spine. It spreads hematologically and can go anywhere in the spine.
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Gentry Wilkerson Oct 14
"The Crashing Cancer Patient" with at 's Crashing Patient Conf Pitfalls: 1. Missing the target with antibiotics 2. Failing to leverage the power of US 3. Failing to think outside of cancer box 4. Blindness to pt's goals of care
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Leen Alblaihed Oct 14
do NOT give epi if the patient's temp is lower than 30 C...
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Dr. Danya Khoujah Oct 14
The crashing hypothermic patient: Severe 🥶 + ⬇️ hr = DO NOT PACE Spend >10 sec looking for a pulse <30˚C = NO epi anticipate difficult airway
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Dr. Danya Khoujah Oct 14
Hypothermia resus When rewarming a patient: 1st the core then the extremities (the other way around = rewarming acidosis)
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Dr. Danya Khoujah Oct 14
Bariatric Disasters: Hx of bariatric surgery + unexplained ⬆️hr = anastomotic leak (until proven otherwise) Hiccups = early sign of acute gastric obstruction Bariatric surgery + belly pain --> think internal hernia
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Gentry Wilkerson Oct 14
"How a Roux-en-Y Can Ruin Your Shift" by Dr. Joe Martinez Think about anastomotic leak in the first 30 days post-op when there is unexplained tachycardia
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U of M Emergency Med Oct 14
Show us your virtual conference watching setup! *g-rated only* 💻 👩‍💻👩🏽‍💻👨🏿‍💻👨🏻‍💻
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Leen Alblaihed Oct 14
Dr. Rosenblatt drops pearls... "fever" in TTP is only present10% of the time.. the "classic pentad" is not classic! ONLY anemia and thrombocytopenia were 100% true in every patient.
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Dr. Danya Khoujah Oct 14
Dr. Lauren Rosenblatt: TTP rarely presents w/ the entire pentad of: anemia ⬇️plt fever Neurological deficit (e.g. seizure, AMS, stroke,..) renal failure Only the first 2 r actually present in almost all
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