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UB Emergency Med
Tweets from our EM residency conference in Buffalo,NY and EM Twitterverse. Tweets do not represent views of the hospitals. They are not medical advice.
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UB Emergency Med Nov 13
Replying to @JLynchDO
Agreed - (surgical lit !)
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UB Emergency Med Nov 13
Don't underestimate the importance of being involved in decision-making where you work
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UB Emergency Med Nov 13
Prevalence of unruptured intracranial aneurysm and SAH are higher in women than men
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UB Emergency Med Nov 13
In SAH, consider nimodipine to prevent delayed cerebral ischemia
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UB Emergency Med Nov 13
In GI bleed - no difference between PPI bolus and drip
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UB Emergency Med Nov 13
Most uncomfortable ER procedure as reported by patients - NGT
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UB Emergency Med Nov 13
Unstable blunt abdominal trauma patient - + FAST should send patient directly for ex-lap
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UB Emergency Med Nov 13
National hotline for button battery ingestion - 202-625-3333
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UB Emergency Med Nov 13
In patients presenting with sx of infection, no obvious source, remember to ask about hx of EVAR, could be aortic graft infection
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UB Emergency Med Oct 25
Delayed sequence intubation can decrease peri-intubation hypoxia.
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UB Emergency Med Oct 25
Bougie use significantly increases first-pass intubation success.
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UB Emergency Med Oct 25
Currant Jelly stool is a delayed finding in intussusception and is not often present in the history
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UB Emergency Med Sep 9
Treatment of inhaled hydrofluoric acid - nebulized calcium gluconate
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UB Emergency Med Sep 9
Treatment of cutaneous hydrofluoric acid burns - calcium gluconate slurry, local infiltration, or even intra-arterial infusion
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UB Emergency Med Sep 9
Hydrofluoric acid burns confer significant mortality, even with <10% TBSA
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UB Emergency Med Jan 27
UBEM@NAEMSP17: Spinal motion restriction protocol reduces decrease in thoracolumbar imaging, no decrease in total radiation dose
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UB Emergency Med retweeted
James Salway 16 Jul 15
Arora discussing recent lit on Peds Cspine trauma
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UB Emergency Med retweeted
emDOCs Team 7 Jul 15
Unexplained abnormal vital signs on discharge / unexplained deaths after discharge: what can we do better?
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UB Emergency Med retweeted
FOAM Highlights 8 Jul 15
"“Found Down”: Do We Need To Worry About The Abdomen?"
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UB Emergency Med retweeted
Stony Brook EM 8 Jul 15
When intubating a hypotensive trauma patient, use low dose ketamine (0.5mg/kg) and high dose rocuronium or succinylcholine (2mg/kg)
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