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Tracy Gough
Earlier this year I released my first book 'My Dementia Journey'. hopefully here you can find some support and guidance to help with yours.
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Tracy Gough 16h
Enjoy every moment of Christmas with your loved one, create memories by taking plenty of photographs and video’s so you can look back on these with your loved one in the future.
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Tracy Gough Dec 12
Keep medication away from your loved one if they are now at risk of taking too many accidently. Boxes of paracetamol or cough mixture for example, should be locked away if this is the case.
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Tracy Gough Dec 12
It may be easier for your loved one to spend Christmas at home where the environment is familiar rather than travelling to other people’s houses which may cause increased confusion and agitation.
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Tracy Gough Dec 11
A new year is approaching, and you may have many fears about what the future will hold for your loved one, try to take each day at a time and live in the moment, rather than worrying about a future that you are unable to change.
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Tracy Gough Dec 10
When looking for a care home go on your ‘gut instinct’ based on a relaxed atmosphere and how happy residents and staff appear, rather than being swayed by the ‘fixtures and fittings’ that you see. A posh care home resembling a 5* hotel may not offer the best standard of care.
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Tracy Gough Dec 9
In the early stages of the illness your loved one may forget to collect their tablets/put in their repeat prescription at the doctors. This happened to me this week with my own loved one. I have now taken control of this situation by ordering and collecting of medication myself.
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Tracy Gough Dec 8
My new book, due next year, is called ‘Gone But Not Forgotten’ and is for caregivers who have lost loved one’s to dementia. Loosing a loved one to dementia, often feels like a ‘double bereavement’ and the aim of this book is to offer help and support during such a difficult time.
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Tracy Gough Dec 7
My book ‘My Dementia Journey….one step at a time’, takes you through each stage of your loved one’s dementia and provides you with space to write your own thoughts and feelings.
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Tracy Gough Dec 7
Your loved one may become more disorientated if they are hospitalised. Your local hospital may allow you to stay with your loved one, beyond their usual visiting times, especially when they are suffering from increased agitation or showing signs of aggression.
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Tracy Gough Dec 6
Your loved one may have lost the ability to communicate properly, however when Christmas carols are being played, they may be able to recall most of the words!
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Tracy Gough Dec 5
Your loved one in the early stages of their illness may try to deny that they have a problem with their memory. It is often best not to question them about this as they may become defensive and argumentative.
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Tracy Gough Dec 4
If your loved one is struggling to chew and swallow, they may need a referral to a Speech and Language Therapist (SALT) which can be arranged by your GP. Until assessed, it may be advisable to fork mash or blend their meat.
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Tracy Gough Dec 4
Replying to @bjakd
Lovely memories to treasure
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Tracy Gough Dec 4
Replying to @Joannew187
Thank you. I've just had my mum diagnosed too so I'm on my own caregiver journey 😪
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Tracy Gough retweeted
TeamAuthorUK Dec 2
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Tracy Gough Dec 1
If your loved one is spending their first year in a care home, it may feel strange not to have them around on Christmas day. You may have guilty feelings about them being there, so as a family try to stagger your visiting times so that your loved one gets plenty of visitors.
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Tracy Gough Nov 30
Dementia clocks are very good in providing orientation to your loved one, as they often feature the day, date, time of day (i.e. morning, afternoon, evening and night), month and year.
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Tracy Gough Nov 30
Ensure your loved one has well fitted shoes or slippers to prevent any unnecessary falls because as their dementia progresses you may find them more unsteady on their feet.
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Tracy Gough Nov 29
Remove all trip hazards from around your loved one’s home, as having falls is often one of the main reasons why your loved one may need long term care, especially if the fall has left them immobile.
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Tracy Gough Nov 28
If your loved one feels the cold at night, there are plenty of warm fleecy bedding available to buy this year. You may also need to increase the tog rating on their quilt for extra warmth.
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