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Tim Sweeney Mar 15
The Epic Games store has a small feature set because we chose to launch it as soon as we had the core feature set up and running, rather than waiting. See for our future roadmap!
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Tim Sweeney Mar 15
As to a store competing on features alone, we believe that wouldn’t be enough to gain traction. Steam has plenty of features, perhaps in some areas too many, and we believe gamers come to a store for particular games rather than for store features.
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Tim Sweeney Mar 15
This would make a good economic analysis. I'd attribute Steam's high marketshare to Valve being the first to release a great service, to continually improving it without major error, and to the effects of Metcalfe's law on social communities and friends graphs.
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Tim Sweeney Mar 15
Early users joined because digital distribution was a new convenience. Later users joined that's where the games were or that's where their friends were, and these factors are powerful and self-reinforcing.
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Georgi Delchev Mar 15
And why do you feel that it is a good thing to break this up? Why fragment the gaming community? Provide ONE good reason for us consumers and not for you.
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Tim Sweeney Mar 15
We're doing this to bring better distribution terms to all PC developers and build a sound business for Epic. For gamers, competition ultimately means better economics, with the 18% savings being reinvested in game development or being passed on through lower prices.
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Armaros Mar 15
So that’s still why with that 18% you are charging consumers for processing fees still?
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Tim Sweeney Mar 15
Payment processing fees are only added for high-overhead payment methods in some international territories. See for the list. Steam does the same for some high-cost payment methods.
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Georgi Delchev Mar 15
Please explain why you do not allow Division 2 to be sold by third-party retailers.
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Tim Sweeney
UbiSoft agreed to a co-exclusive on UPlay and the Epic Games store. Epic Games seeks exclusive games in order to have a unique lineup of games so there’s another reason for gamers to come to our store.
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Georgi Delchev Mar 15
No, you misunderstand me. I am talking about third-party retailers who could sell Epic keys, just like they do with Steam keys. Please explain why you are against this. This is one of the few ways with which developers can get an even higher percentage of a key sell.
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Tim Sweeney Mar 15
Let us dig into this topic here. It’s a good question and we wholeheartedly support key sales for non-exclusive games.
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Tim Sweeney Mar 16
I criticized Microsoft for their initiative to prevent competing stores like Steam and Epic Games store from running on some upcoming versions of Windows.
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Paul Mar 16
How does buying exclusivity fit with this?
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Georgi Delchev Mar 16
Simple. Exclusivity hurt his business before, but is helping now. :)
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mfracturf Mar 16
Gonna pirate all the epic games store exclusives. Rather spend my money on steam and gog.
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John D'Oriocourt Mar 16
So, competing by locking out content instead of improving your service. Got it.
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Adam Dayton Mar 16
And there it is.
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Trebor Mar 17
Antitrust...gg Epic.
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