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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
Replying to @TheRaDR
“The longer they're there, the worse conditions get.... As you see mental health crises and contagious diseases begin to set in, they'll work to manage the worst of it. [But] then there will be the ability to tag these people as diseased, even if we created [those conditions]”
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
Replying to @TheRaDR
“Single adults were held in cells designed for 1/5 as many detainees as were housed there and were wearing soiled clothing for days or weeks with limited access to showers, the report said. Pictures published with the report show women packed tightly together in a holding cell.”
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
Replying to @TheRaDR
“We also observed detainees standing on toilets in the cells to make room and gain breathing space, thus limiting access to toilets,” the watchdog wrote.
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
Replying to @TheRaDR
This was at Paso del Norte, a facility near El Paso, which has a stated capacity of 125 detainees. But when DHS inspectors visited, it was holding 900. For a period, Border Patrol tried housing migrants in cage under a nearby bridge. It was ultimately scrapped amid public outcry”
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
Replying to @TheRaDR
“When migrants & asylum-seekers are transferred to ICE, things get worse. Queer and trans migrants face exceptionally harsh treatment, w/reports of high levels of physical and sexual abuse, & the use of solitary confinement—considered torture by many psychologists—is widespread.”
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
Replying to @TheRaDR
“As a reminder, by DHS's own assertion, these detainments are civil, not criminal, and are not meant to be punitive.”
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
Replying to @TheRaDR
“But you don't have to intend to kill everyone to have bad outcomes. In Cuba, well over 100,000 civilians died in camps in just a couple years. In Southern Africa during the Boer War, fatalities went into the tens of thousands. The overwhelming majority of them were children.”
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
Replying to @TheRaDR
"There's usually this crisis period that a camp system either survives or doesn't in the first 3 or 4 years. If it goes past that length of time, they tend to continue for a really long time. And I think we have entered that crisis period. I don't yet know if we're out of it."
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
Replying to @TheRaDR
“the longer you establish this sort of extralegal, extrajudicial, somewhat-invisible no-man's land, the more you allow potentially a culture of abuse to develop within that place. Because the people who tend to become more violent, more prejudiced, whatever, have more & more +
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
Replying to @TheRaDR
.. free rein for that to become sort of the accepted behavior. Then, that also becomes a new norm that can spread throughout the system. There is sort of an escalation of individual initiative in violence....+
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
Replying to @TheRaDR
“As it becomes clear that that is acceptable, then you have a self-fulfilling prophecy or a positive feedback loop that just keeps radicalizing the treatment as the policy itself becomes radicalizing."
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
Replying to @TheRaDR
"The more authoritarian the regime is, and the more people allow governments to get away with doing this sort of thing politically, the worse the conditions are likely to get," Hyslop says. "So, a lot of it depends on how much pushback there is. “ How much pushback.
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
Replying to @TheRaDR
“Another issue is that these camp systems, no matter where they are in the world, tend to fall victim to expanding criteria. The longer they stay open, the more reasons a government finds to put people in them.”
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
Replying to @TheRaDR
”That's particularly true if a new regime takes control of an existing system, as the Trump administration did with ours.”
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg
"Let's say there's 20 hurdles that we have to get over before we get to someplace really, really, really bad," Pitzer says. "I think we've knocked 10 of them down."
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
So what do we do? 3 first things (thanks for this language, I’m quoting her verbatim): 1. Donate if you’re able to , preferably set up an automatic monthly amount.
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
Replying to @resistbot
2. Call your senators. Call your representatives. Use if you’re not a phone person. Do it again the next day.
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
Replying to @TheRaDR
3. If you don’t already know the local organizing near you, google “immigrant justice” & your town or the closest big city. Volunteer whatever time you can, and make it regular: an hour a week makes a difference.
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
Replying to @TheRaDR
We need to make fighting for these immigrants the priority. Human life and safety is at stake. The answer to “what would you have done if you were a German in the late 1930s?” is yours to answer. This is not a time for business as usual. Never. Again. Is. Now.
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Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg Jun 14
Replying to @TheRaDR
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