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TheLastRefuge
1. Watch this video. People don't understand how Broward County School Sheriff Officers operate. I'll explain.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
2. I spent about 18 months in 2012, 2013 and 2014 investigating Broward and Miami-Dade school policies and how those policies transfer to law enforcement practices.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
3. My interest was initially accidental. I discovered an untold story of massive scale and consequence as a result of initial research into Trayvon Martin and his High School life.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
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4. What I stumbled upon was a Broward County law enforcement system in a state of conflict. The Broward County School Board and District Superintendent, entered into a political agreement with Broward County Law enforcement officials to stop arresting students for crimes.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
5. The motive was simple. The school system administrators wanted to "improve their statistics" and gain state and federal grant money for improvements therein.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
6. So police officials, the very highest officials of law enforcement (Sheriff and Police Chiefs), entered into a plan.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
7. As soon as Miami-Dade began to receive the benefits (political and financial) from the scheme, Broward County joined on. The approach in Broward was identical as the approach in Miami-Dade.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
8. It's important to remember, this was not an arbitrary change - this was a well-planned fundamental shift in the entire dynamic of how teenagers would be treated when they engaged in criminal conduct.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
9. The primary problem was the policy conflicted with laws; and over time the policy began to create outcomes where illegal behavior by students was essentially unchecked by law enforcement.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
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10. Initially the police were excusing misdemeanor behaviors. However, it didn't take long until felonies, even violent felonies (armed robberies, assaults and worse) were being excused.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
11. The need to continue lowering the arrests year-over-year meant that increasingly more severe unlawful behavior had to be ignored. Over time even the most severe of unlawful conduct was being filtered by responding police.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
12. We found out about it, when six cops blew the whistle on severe criminal conduct they were being instructed to hide. The sheriff and police Chiefs were telling street cops and school cops to ignore ever worsening criminal conduct.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
13. The police were in a bind. They were encountering evidence of criminal conduct and yet they had to hide the conduct. There were examples of burglary and robbery where the police had to hide the recovered evidence in order to let the kids get away without reports.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
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14. The police would take the stolen merchandise and intentionally falsify police records to record stolen merchandise *as if* they just found it on the side of the road.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
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15. They put drugs and stolen merchandise in bags, and sent it to storage rooms in the police department. Never assigning the recovery to criminal conduct. Stolen merchandise was just sitting in storage rooms gathering dust.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
16. They couldn't get the stuff back to the victim because that would mean the police would have to explain how they took custody of it. So they just hid it. To prove this was happening one of the officers told me where to look, and who the victim was.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
17. At first I didn't believe them. However, after getting information from detectives, cross referencing police reports, and looking at the "found merchandise", I realized they were telling the truth.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
18. A massive internal investigation took place and the results were buried. Participating in the cover-up were people in the media who were connected to the entire political apparatus.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
19. The sheriff and police chief could always deny the violent acts (assaults, rapes, beatings etc.) were being ignored; that's why the good guys in the police dept gave the evidence of the stolen merchandise. That physical evidence couldn't be ignored and proved the scheme.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
20. From 2012 though 2018 it only got worse. In Broward and Miami-Dade it is almost impossible for a student to get arrested. The staff within the upper levels of LEO keep track of arrests and when a certain number is reached all else is excused.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
21. Well it didn't take long for criminal gangs in Broward and Miami-Dade to realize the benefit of using students for their criminal activities. After all, the kids would be let go... so organized crime became easier to get away with if they enlisted high-school kids.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
22. As criminals became more adept at the timing within the offices of the officials, they timed their biggest crimes to happen after the monthly maximum arrest quota was made.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
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23. The most serious of armed robberies etc. were timed for later in the month or quarter. The really serious crimes were timed in the latter phases of the data collection periods. This way the student criminals were almost guaranteed to get away with it.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
24. Now. You can see how that entire process gets worse over time. Present corruption (the need to hide the policy) expands in direct relationship to the corruption before it. This is where the School Police come into play.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
25. Understanding the risk behind the scheme, it became increasingly important to put the best corrupt cops in the schools. *BEST* as in *SMARTEST*. Those SRO's became the ones who were best at hiding the unlawful conduct.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
26. Again, over time, the most corrupt police officers within the system became the police inside the schools. These officers were those who are best skilled at identifying the political objectives and instructions.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
27. Those "School Cops" also have special privileges. It's a great gig. They get free "on campus" housing close to the schools they are assigned to etc. They're crooked as hell and the criminal kids how just how to play them. It's a game. Also an open secret.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
28. A lot of it came out during an earlier *internal affairs* investigation. Unfortunately the behavior never changed because the politics never changed. It's still going on:
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
29. For years this has been happening and no-one cared. Crimes happen; students excused; victims ignored; etc. The Broward County School and Law Enforcement system is designed to flow exactly this way. It's politics.
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
30. Only then a Parkland school shooting happened. For Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel this had to be an "oh shit" moment; but not for the reasons the media initially thought. If people start digging, they'll discover the shooter was one of those previously excused students
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TheLastRefuge 22 Feb 18
Replying to @TheLastRefuge2
31. The same sentiment applies for Sheriff Scott's partner, School Superintendent Robert Runcie (previously from Chicago),.... things are very risky if people start digging.
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