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News, reports and events from the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), the leading independent research institute on economics and public policy
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IFS retweeted
Intergenerational Fairness & Provision Committee 11h
In July from and from the let the Committee know their proposals for the , , , and and
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IFS 14h
Debates about are often controversial. Next Wednesday, we’ll talk about the challenges the system faces and look into the future of welfare policy. 💡 Join us at the or here on Twitter via livestream 🔍 To find out more:
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IFS retweeted
CIPFA 15h
In the face of funding cuts from central government, many have chosen to significantly cut council tax support (CTS). Join us in association with to discuss the impacts of localised council tax support schemes on 5 March in Manchester:
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IFS 19h
Strong public finance figures from the are good news for the Chancellor. But a deteriorating economic outlook could still make for tricky fiscal arithmetic in the . Our analysis:
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IFS retweeted
Heather Jameson Feb 21
Just arrived in Manchester - looks like I'm about two weeks too early for this... which is a pity as it looks like a good debate to have
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Paul Johnson Feb 21
We could have predicted and acted on many current public policy problems. We know a lot about what the future holds given demographic change and policy on pensions, housing, education etc Social scientists and policy makers often far too slow to recognise and respond
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IFS Feb 21
Replying to @TheIFS
The could still pose challenges. Since the Budget, the Bank of England downgraded the outlook for growth. If official forecasts follow, £5 billion could be added to the deficit in the medium term. Read more on the Chancellor’s choices:
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IFS Feb 21
Replying to @TheIFS
Borrowing this year is set to be better than expected, based on today's figures. At around £22 billion, it’s likely to be even lower than the £25.5 billion predicted in October last year.
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IFS Feb 21
Today’s strong public finance figures from are good news for the Chancellor , but a deteriorating economic outlook could still make for tricky fiscal arithmetic in the . More here:
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IFS retweeted
Paul Johnson Feb 21
MHCLG proposals to base much of council spending assessment just on population numbers (not accounting for eg deprivation) do not stand up to scrutiny. The inferences they draw from their statistical analysis are problematic. response here
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IFS Feb 20
Replying to @mhclg
.’s rationale for including population only is that it statistically explains the vast majority of spending variation across councils – but this is driven by the fact population varies so much between councils.
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IFS Feb 20
Replying to @TheIFS
Deprivation is concentrated in inner city areas, so places like inner London, Manchester, Birmingham and Bradford would be hit. Rural and suburban areas like outer London would typically benefit.
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IFS Feb 20
. proposes to assess councils’ needs for spending on homelessness, libraries, environmental health, economic development and many other areas on just population. Analysis suggests this would hit deprived areas compared to existing formula:
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IFS Feb 20
IFS researchers are working closely w/ to build strong relationships w/ partner governments, develop & implement new tax models & tools, and generate important evidence on tax policy in low- and middle-income countries. See more here from
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IFS retweeted
CIOT Feb 20
Excited that CIOT/ debate, 6.30-8pm Monday, on HMRC powers & citizens' responsibilities, with , ex-HMRC, Kelly Sizer , Malcolm Gammie TLRC & (chair) will be livestreamed at
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IFS Feb 19
Debates about policy are often controversial because they go right to the heart of what kind of society we want to be. We're discussing the future of benefits next Wednesday. Join the conversation:
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Paul Johnson Feb 19
Most councils now require those on lowest incomes to contribute to council tax bills - not full rebates as under the old council tax benefit. This is a big change to benefits and local tax, resulting in big increases in arrears and unpaid bills. Important event - come along.
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IFS Feb 19
Replying to @TheIFS
There are around 370,000 higher-rate taxpayers in Scotland. From April, many of these will pay over £1,500 a year more income tax in Scotland than they would in the rest of the UK. The 1.4 million people earning between £12,500 and £26,000 will pay up to £20.49 less.
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IFS Feb 19
Replying to @TheIFS
The Scottish Government's plans imply a freeze in the income tax higher-rate threshold in Scotland from April. Elsewhere in the UK the threshold will rise, so this further increases the revenue raised from higher earners in Scotland compared with the rest of the UK.
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IFS Feb 19
MSPs are to vote on Scotland's Income Tax rates today. Since gaining more powers over taxation the Scottish Government has set income tax rates to raise more revenue, more progressively, than if they applied the same tax schedule as the rest of the UK.
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