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News, reports and events from the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), the leading independent research institute on economics and public policy
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IFS 13h
The deficit is down to pre-crisis levels, but debt is higher than it was by 50% of national income and is set to fall slowly. From the Green Budget, out this week:
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MiSoC Oct 19
Our colleagues at will be discussing "How can we best tackle the gender pay gap and ‘motherhood penalty’?" in Westminster on 7 Nov as part of , panellists from (5/5)
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Bham Business School Oct 19
'Funding public services: Postcode lotteries or local responsibilities?' - Join the discussion with , and (Assistant Chief Executive ) as part of the on 7th November: Register:
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IFS Oct 19
If 2018–19 borrowing turns out lower than forecast in the 2018 Spring Statement, it would be the 7th time in 9 fiscal years since began forecasting that borrowing in the 1st year of the forecast horizon came out lower than anticipated. Read more:
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Helen Miller Oct 19
Martin Wolf summarises some of key points in Green Budget ‘Known unknowns’ to help the UK budget for Brexit - via
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IFS Oct 18
In 2016, almost 80% of young adults would have needed to save more than 6 months of their post-tax income for a 10% deposit on an average home in their area. Just one third would have had to in 1996. Research from the :
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IFS Oct 18
Replying to @TheIFS
The Chancellor could fund an ‘end to austerity’ by raising taxes by 1% of national income. Taxes would be near the highest level seen post-war, but the UK’s tax burden would still rank near the middle of OECD countries. 📗 Read more:
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IFS Oct 18
Replying to @TheIFS
The Chancellor's existing spending commitments would imply cuts to other areas of day-to-day spending amounting to around £19 billion by 2022−23 - if the provisional spending totals from the Spring Statement are kept to. (3/4)
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IFS Oct 18
Replying to @TheIFS
Having fallen dramatically since its peak in 2009–10, this year borrowing will be at its lowest share of national income since 2001–02. (2/4)
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IFS Oct 18
Absent substantial tax rises or much better-than-expected growth, 'ending austerity' is not compatible with reducing the deficit further. A short thread on the public finances, with insights from the (1/1)
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Paul Johnson Oct 18
New from Raising pension age increased no. of women in early 60s in work. But not for poorer women: those on benefits and non home owners. Chart shows big problem: majority of women affected did not know what their pension age would be
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CHASM Oct 18
Funding public services: Postcode lotteries or local responsibilities? Join the discussion with and including Assistant Chief Executive for the on Weds 7th November Register:
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IFS Oct 18
Looking for independent analysis of the Chancellor's choices as he prepares for ? If you couldn't make it to the this week, you can watch the launch event, download slides and get the full report now:
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IFS Oct 17
Replying to @TheIFS
Women who did not know their increased state pension age in advance – a majority – did not respond to recent increases by finding or staying in paid work. New IFS research using the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing:
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IFS Oct 17
Replying to @TheIFS
Less wealthy women, renters, and those out of work or on benefits at 58, are less likely to have replaced their delayed state pension income with income from employment. The reform hasn't had an impact on well-being measures, like loneliness, depression or quality of life (2/3)
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IFS Oct 17
Between 2010 and 2018 the female state pension age increased from 60 to 65. This has increased employment among affected women over 60, although not enough to avoid the average incomes of this group falling. (1/3)
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IFS Oct 17
What are the benefits, costs and risks with tax devolution? What might it mean for different parts of the country with different sized tax bases? Find out at our joint event with on 22 October. Sign up here:
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IFS Oct 17
Replying to @CathMurray_
Thanks Cath!
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Paul Johnson Oct 17
This quiet cut in benefits, seeing them fall relative to prices, is going into its 4th year. On average recipients will be more than £400 a year worse off as a result of this 4 year freeze. Not the end of austerity for those dependent on most working age benefits.
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IFS Oct 17
Replying to @TheIFS
This is the last year in a four year freeze. In total, 10.4 million households have seen a £420 reduction in their benefits between 2015-16 and 2019-20, and the Exchequer has saved £4.4 billion.
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