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Susan Feb 6
Allow me to let you in on a secret: Disabled people are very well aware that accessibility is expensive. We don't need to be told that. You know how we know? Because we've been funding it our damn selves for a very very long time.
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Susan Feb 6
Replying to @SusanCantPlayIt
I have absolutely zero sympathy for any size game studio talking about how expensive making things accessible is because hi, hello, welcome to the club. You know how you could minimize that cost? By implementing accessible features from the planning stage.
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Oops! All Phil! 🏳️‍🌈 Feb 6
Replying to @SusanCantPlayIt
Last year I commissioned an accessibility study for our corporate website. Very eye-opening stuff but beyond just helping me lobby for fixes, it informed the planning of new features. I was able to red-pen a new mockup because users with visual issues wouldn't have an easy time.
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Oops! All Phil! 🏳️‍🌈
So yeah, the more you learn about accessibility, the LESS EXPENSIVE YOU MAKE IT for your future self.
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Susan Feb 6
Replying to @ThatDangPhil
I think that right there is the biggest change that needs to happen. People still don't even want to consider accessibility because it's been made out to be a negative thing (e.g. all the people yelling about how making games accessible will make them less fun).
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Oops! All Phil! 🏳️‍🌈 Feb 6
Replying to @SusanCantPlayIt
Yeah I think it's perceived of like a chore, like "ughhh you have to appease all these government regulators and lawyers and suits." But, actually it's just good *customer* service, and study after study shows accessible design benefits EVERYONE.
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Oops! All Phil! 🏳️‍🌈 Feb 6
Replying to @SusanCantPlayIt
(that ALL CAPS was directed at us designers and developers, not disabled folx btw)
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