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José R. Ralat
Taco writer. food editor, words: Texas Monthly, Thrillist, Eater & more. Forthcoming book: American Tacos (UT Press, 2020). Avi
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José R. Ralat 9h
Avocado would be good. But also pickled mustard. If you can find a rye tortilla, perfection could be within reach.
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José R. Ralat 9h
Pastrami is better in a taco too.
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José R. Ralat 13h
Reassuring words as la esposa & the dogs and I are hunkered down during a tornado warning.
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José R. Ralat 13h
That’s just the sweetest. Thanks—especially to the little man.
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José R. Ralat 16h
Father’s Day food.
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José R. Ralat Jun 15
Pick a podcast, man. Nine times out of 10, it’s the same crap. Sweeping declarations about whatever based on anecdotes. The fact that it’s produced in Texas really pisses me off. Every Texan should know better.
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José R. Ralat retweeted
Shea Serrano Jun 15
mexicans are perfect
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José R. Ralat Jun 15
Replying to @fbscofield
It’s prejudice, denial, ignorance. Communities should feel ownership for local foodways & support. For example, many Kansas Citians were unaware of their homegrown Parmesan-topped taco.
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José R. Ralat Jun 15
My buddy Rich Vana opened his restaurant, , more than two years ago in Frisco, TX. I am a terrible friend & waited until today to eat there. Lunch was great, especially the house burger. Because sometimes not tacos.
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José R. Ralat Jun 15
Replying to @cristianalcocer
Gracias!
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José R. Ralat Jun 15
Replying to @brandonmohon
Cured is amazing. I eat there every time I’m in San Antonio. But it isn’t a modern Mexican restaurant.
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José R. Ralat retweeted
Salsa Pistolero Jun 15
Replying to @TacoTrail
🙋🏻‍♂️ (maybe not to that extent but I try my best with the best lard and the flour I can get) I make homemade flour tortillas for every event, every time tho. That’s the Durango and Coahuila way.
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José R. Ralat Jun 15
Replying to @extramsg
Good points. I've noticed a new acceptance of the $2 taco as the industry low-end norm. But even that's ridiculous. What I would consider a cheap taco, one served on a commodity corn tortilla with cheap fillings should cost $3. Every taqueria should charge at least 50 cents more.
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José R. Ralat Jun 15
Replying to @TacoTrail
I can't think of another Texas modern Mexican restaurant that gives flour tortillas such careful consideration (if they consider flour tortillas at all). Can you? If so, please share.
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José R. Ralat Jun 15
Replying to @TacoTrail
This is potentially revolutionary. Flour tortillas tend to be derided in favor of corn tortillas, especially heirloom corn tortillas, in the realm of modern Mexican cuisine. But Erales &co at Comedor just up & put one on the menu. They take all masa seriously. 18/
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José R. Ralat Jun 15
Replying to @TacoTrail
The Mexican-born, El Paso-raised chef grew up eating thin, flaky Sonoran-style flour tortillas and he insisted the style be available at Comedor. I can't think of another modern Mexican restaurant in Texas that makes its flour tortillas, never mind a specific style. 17/
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José R. Ralat Jun 15
Replying to @TacoTrail
The tortilla is made from Sonoran wheat grown by Barton Springs Mill in Dripping Springs, TX, & it's available because the chefs are from the border, where flour tortillas are prevalent. But the specific chef behind the decision for the specific style was Gabe Erales 16/
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José R. Ralat Jun 15
Replying to @TacoTrail
I thought I was done. But nope. Last weekend my meal at Comedor has forced me to reevaluate my thoughts on Texas' mid-range & high-end taquerias & Mexican restaurants. It was all because of a Southwestern borderlands-style flour tortilla 15/
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José R. Ralat Jun 15
Replying to @TacoTrail
I bet you change your mind. 14/
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José R. Ralat Jun 15
Replying to @TacoTrail
But if you're serious about learning about tacos. Ask a taquero/a to walk you through the sourcing of food, which can include importing, market prices & their relation to quality, labor practices, cultural significance and then ask to watch the preparation of a taco. 13/
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