Twitter | Search | |
Tom Inglesby
Director of , working to protect people from epidemics & disasters. Inf diseases, pub health, research, policy
3,960
Tweets
1,305
Following
91,243
Followers
Tweets
Tom Inglesby 4h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
Our work now is to take all we've learned and make sure we apply it to the pandemic work ahead. 30/end
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 4h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
The good news now is that we know what we need to do to bring this virus under control. We have seen other countries do it successfully, and we are starting to see it in places in the US (e.g. Vermont, only 3 hospitalized, and no deaths since July). 29/x
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 4h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
Manipulation of science seemed like it was only possible in other places and times. Need now to stand up for science to operate w/out interference. Need to stand up for work w/ international health organizations and other countries who are fighting against same challenge 28/x
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 4h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
We've learned there’s no guarantee that US science will be left to get to the truth, that it will be allowed to communicate freely what the evidence shows. It's fragile in a way that didn’t seem possible in a democracy. 27/x
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 4h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
Unfortunately we've seen scientists, public health officials and our government science agencies can be badly undermined. We've witnessed scientific recommendations get changed by a political process. 26/x
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 4h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
Imagine what it would have been like to deal w/ COVID, w/out cutting edge science. The daily discoveries and analyses in epidemiology, viral genetics, immunology, clinical response, therapeutics, infection control, diagnostics, aerosols, social science, and so much more. 25/x
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 4h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
But also have seen politics could derail the success of this unprecedented vaccine effort. That many Americans are concerned about safety and don’t plan to take it. Political interference in the process could end up sabotaging the greatest tool we have for controlling COVID. 24/x
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 4h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
Its been very encouraging to see the strong partnership between government and industry move vaccine development faster than ever seemed possible. A safe and effective vaccine could emerge this winter, perhaps ~ a year from discovery of a new pandemic. 23/x
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 4h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
We've seen that global partnerships can be badly damaged without much notice. That our generations long work with WHO and other countries' science agencies can be badly fractured with no real basis. 22/x
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 4h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
But the toll on health care workers has been terrible. Very high numbers of infections, many deaths. Still reports of PPE shortages even recently. HCWs deserve the nation’s deep gratitude for the risks they've taken in this response. And they need PPE that protects them 21/x
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 4h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
Some good news is that clinical medicine has made substantial improvements in ways people are cared for during serious COVID hospitalizations. You can see that w/ rising survival for critically ill pts in number of places 20/x
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 5h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
Reporting on COVID has been often reduced to counting those who live and those who died. We need far more focus on the long term complications of this disease. 19/x
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 5h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
Also clear now there are many survivors of COVID who have serious long term complications. We don’t have clear statistics on them, and need to get them. Learn how to best care for them. 18/x
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 5h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
The number of deaths caused by COVID are higher than deaths that had definitive diagnosis. On order of 225,000 excess deaths have occurred from mid Mar to Aug 29. Often takes weeks to enter deaths into national databases, so this is serious undercount 17/x
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 5h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
This past week COVID killed on the order of 5600 people, making it the second leading cause of death in US after heart disease, killing more than lung cancer which causes nearly 4,000 deaths a week. 16/x
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 5h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
Early comparison of COVID to a bad flu season were terribly wrong even in the early weeks. That was really very clear then, and it is only more so now. One useful comparison: flu causes between 12000 and 61,000 deaths annually. 15/x
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 5h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
Impact of this virus has been repeatedly underestimated. At the start of this. Again in spring when some said it'd be gone by summer. Or that it'd be burned out in the heat. And now we are hearing that again this fall. We should stop underestimating it.14/x
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 5h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
National and state response efforts -- including access to testing and vaccine development process - need to be guided by this increased risk and severity of this disease in people of color 13/x
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 5h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
People of color disproportionately being sickened and killed by this virus. Reasons inc. higher representation in essential jobs, greater incidence of underlying conditions, less access to medical care, et al 12/x
Reply Retweet Like
Tom Inglesby 5h
Replying to @T_Inglesby
We have seen that there vulnerable groups that need special plans, resources and protections – nursing homes, prisons, food processing facilities, congregate living settings, immigrant detention centers. No modern precedent for how this virus has spread in these groups 11/x
Reply Retweet Like