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Sylvia A. Earle
Oceanographer, National Geographic Explorer-In-Residence, Founder of and 2009 TED Prize Winner. Saving and restoring the blue heart of the planet.
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Sylvia A. Earle Sep 13
I am thrilled to share that the Coastal Waters of the Black River District Hope Spot in Mauritius has been recognized as a Hope Spot!
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Sylvia A. Earle Sep 9
The natural world shapes this planet in ways that make our existence possible.
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Sylvia A. Earle Sep 5
A great big thank you to everyone for joining me on my birthday and celebrating 10 years of . The best gift of all is the support you've shown for Hope Spots and protecting the big blue heart of our planet. Onward and downward! 💙
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Sylvia A. Earle Aug 29
It is my privilege to share the Tribugá Gulf is a Hope Spot!
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Sylvia A. Earle Aug 29
I really try to get people to explore the ocean any way they can—look at the films, read the books, become knowledgeable. But, in the end, there’s nothing more meaningful than going yourself.
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Sylvia A. Earle Aug 23
I am delighted to share that the Florida Gulf Coast is now a Hope Spot! A big blue salute to the champions in Florida. This place has special meaning to me because as a kid I fell in love with the ocean right there in Dunedin.
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Sylvia A. Earle Aug 21
A huge wave of gratitude to everyone who has supported , and for the beautiful birthday sentiments. I look forward to the next 10 years of Hope Spots!
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Sylvia A. Earle Aug 19
For my birthday, I would be deeply thankful if you would join me in celebrating 10 years of Hope by supporting !
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Sylvia A. Earle Aug 15
It's my honor to share with you that Western Australia’s Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Coast World Heritage Area is a Hope Spot!
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Sylvia A. Earle Aug 13
For the first - and maybe the last - time in history, we have a chance to make peace with the ocean and the rest of the living world, and in so doing, secure an enduring place for ourselves on this small blue part of the universe.
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Sylvia A. Earle Aug 10
Imagine our impact on creatures that have never known predators like humans. We have some real thinking to do about extracting wildlife from the sea on a large scale. And we are armed with knowledge, we should pause to think about it.
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Sylvia A. Earle Aug 6
Resilience to climate change is dependent upon having significant areas of natural protection—for biodiversity and for all the things that hold the planet steady. Hope Spots are vitally important to protect our life-support system.
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Sylvia A. Earle Aug 1
We must make peace with the natural world, and soon. My dear friend Dr. Dan Laffoley just released a paper listing 8 steps we can take to do so, and I urge you to read it and act now. We need to protect the blue heart of the planet and our very existence.
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Sylvia A. Earle Jul 31
Without the blue, there is no green.
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Sylvia A. Earle Jul 30
How much of your heart do you want to protect? We really need to think about the world, the ocean, and nature as our life support system and do everything we can to protect it.
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Sylvia A. Earle Jul 28
Marine Protected Areas are to the sea what national parks are to the land. They’re sources of restoration, sources of hope.
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Mission Blue Jul 25
Heads up! Important science coming out today thanks to our Hope Spot Champion David Sims!
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Sylvia A. Earle Jul 22
Please join me and for a webinar on July 24th at 1pm EDT. We will be talking about my favorite subjects, including Hope Spots and ocean protection!
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John Hanke Jul 21
One of the reasons Tentacool is my buddy. Sometimes reality is more mindbending than augmented reality.
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Sylvia A. Earle Jul 21
I always wanted to be a scientist. I always wanted to do something that would keep me asking questions, exploring, and getting to know life on Earth.
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