Twitter | Search | |
This is the legacy version of twitter.com. We will be shutting it down on 15 December 2020. Please switch to a supported browser or device. You can see a list of supported browsers in our Help Center.
Swiss Ramble 20 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
Bundesliga TV revenue in 2017/18 was estimated to be €98m by German media, unsurprisingly the highest in Germany, ahead of Borussia Dortmund €88m, Schalke 04 €80m and Bayer Leverkusen €78m. Worth noting that RB Leipzig received just €30m, as only recently promoted.
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 20 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
German clubs including have benefited from the new 4-year TV deal from 2017/18, which was up 85% over previous period. However, other leagues will see large growth this season, so Premier League and La Liga will extend the difference, while Ligue 1 will narrow the gap.
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 20 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
Assuming that TV pool was unchanged, earned €79m for reaching Champions League last 16, €9m more than 2017/18 (despite reaching the semi-final that year), mainly due to 54% increase in prize money. Other German clubs: Dortmund €64m, Schalke €62m & Hoffenheim €26m.
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 20 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
also benefited from the introduction of the new UEFA coefficient payment (based on performances over 10 years), where they had the 3rd highest ranking of clubs competing that season, guaranteeing them €33m. Dortmund and Schalke received €22m and €20m respectively.
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 21 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
have earned significantly more revenue (€319m) from European competition than any other German club in the last 5 years. The closest challenger is Dortmund with €195m (i.e. €124m lower), followed by Schalke €118m, Leverkusen €109m and Mönchengladbach €64m.
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 21 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
match day revenue fell €11m (11%) to €92m in 2018/19, partly due to staging 2 fewer Champions League games. Despite Germany’s reputation for low ticket prices, their match day revenue of €104m in 2017/18 was actually the 5th largest in the world.
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 21 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
match day revenue is around 50% higher than Dortmund, even though their average attendance of 75,000 is around 6,000 lower than their rivals’ 81,000. The Bavarians are in turn much higher than Schalke 61,000 and Stuttgart 55,000.
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 21 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
wage bill shot up €34m (11%) to €336m, which means that wages have risen by €109m (48%) since 2015. Wages to turnover ratio has steadily risen from 44% to 51% in the last few years.
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 21 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
enjoy a major competitive advantage in Germany, as their wage bill of €336m is a hefty €131m (64%) higher than Borussia Dortmund’s €205m. The gap closed to “only” €87m in 2016/17, but has since widened to stand at the highest ever.
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 21 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
In Europe, €336m wage bill is the fifth highest in Europe, around the same level as Juventus €328m, though Barcelona €501m are miles ahead. It is also possible that they might be overtaken when other clubs publish their 2018/19 accounts, e.g. and .
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble
Despite the increase in wages to turnover ratio from 48% to 51%, have one of the lowest ratios among the leading clubs, only beaten by Tottenham 39% and Real Madrid 48%, but significantly better than the likes of Juventus 66%, Barcelona 59% and 59%.
Reply Retweet Like More
Swiss Ramble 21 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
’s other staff cost, player amortisation, the annual expense to write-down transfer fees, significantly fell €21m (30%) to €48m without any explanation. For context, this is less than a third of the player amortisation at clubs like , and Juventus.
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 21 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
This is partly due to €74m of net player sales in 2018/19 with only €10m gross spend, though this rebounded to €144m in 2019/20, including the €80m record buy of Lucas Hernandez from Atletico Madrid plus €35m to take Benjamin Pavard from Stuttgart.
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 21 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
Traditionally, spend much more on players than their German rivals, but their €117m net spend over the last 4 seasons is behind RB Leipzig €146m, though considerably more than Dortmund, who actually had net sales of €111m.
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 21 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
On a gross basis, it’s a different story with Dortmund €449m being over €100m more than €340m, followed by RB Leipzig €263m and Wolfsburg €224m. That said, if Leroy Sané had not injured himself, Bayern might have bought the winger and been up there again.
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 21 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
bank debt (to finance the stadium) was paid off 16 years ahead of schedule in 2014, having been as high as €167m in 2009, while cash has risen from €40m to €221m in 2018. We will not know 2019 figure until full accounts released, but current assets are a bit lower.
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 21 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
Using the broadest definition of debt, total liabilities are only €234m, which is one of the lowest of the leading European clubs. Barcelona and Manchester United are around €1 bln higher at €1.2 bln followed by Tottenham €1.1 bln and Juventus €911m.
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 21 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
cash balance of €221m is the 3rd highest in Europe, only behind Manchester United €347m and Arsenal €261m. Interestingly, Champions League winners and Juventus only had €12m and €10m respectively.
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 21 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
Having no interest payments has given a competitive advantage. To place this into perspective, five leading clubs have net interest payable above €20m: Inter €29m, Roma €28m, €25m, Atletico Madrid €25m and €21m.
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 21 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
have been boosted by strategic partnerships with 3 major German companies (Adidas, Allianz & Audi), who all have an 8.33% stake in the club with the other 75% owned by the fans. Dividends to these shareholders have steadily risen, up from €12m to €15m in 2019.
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 21 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
CEO Karl-Heinz Rummenigge was “extremely pleased” with the club’s financial development, but was keen to emphasise that the board’s goal “is not the maximisation of profit, but the maximisation of sporting success.”
Reply Retweet Like
Swiss Ramble 21 Nov 19
Replying to @SwissRamble
Deputy chairman Jan-Christian Dreesen added, “ rests on very solid foundations, which allows us to make the necessary investment in the first-team squad, despite the increasingly difficult transfer market.” Supporters will hope that this is indeed the case.
Reply Retweet Like