Twitter | Search | |
PlaneOnSwift
This is one of the most incredible “hidden history” stories I have ever read. Remaining IE6 holdouts were the floodgates holding back innumerable technologies. It was entrenched. A conspiracy to kill it by a small group of engineers changed the world.
Reply Retweet Like More
Chad Loder ✿ May 3
Replying to @SwiftOnSecurity
Tried to click on the link; it uses some archaic protocol called "http" which my browser does not recognize. Must be something that predates https.
Reply Retweet Like
sair May 3
Replying to @SwiftOnSecurity
Reply Retweet Like
Vincent Milum Jr May 3
Replying to @SwiftOnSecurity
If Microsoft would have just decoupled the release cycle of Internet Explorer from the release cycle of Windows, this would never have been an issue. The long pause between XP and Vista is what destroyed web development thanks to IE6 being forced to stick around longer.
Reply Retweet Like
Alexander May 3
It's even worse that when you try to load it with HTTPS, it's an invalid certificate issued to a totally different domain name
Reply Retweet Like
Chad Loder ✿ May 3
I use in EASE mode, so it didn't even let me get that far.
Reply Retweet Like
PlaneOnSwift May 3
Replying to @SwiftOnSecurity
My thread on how Chrome similarly was used as way to bludgeon the web and desktop ecosystem for the better.
Reply Retweet Like
sammydee May 3
Replying to @SwiftOnSecurity
Heroes don't always wear capes. Best story I've read for months!
Reply Retweet Like
Joe Ortiz May 3
Replying to @SwiftOnSecurity
And yet we're in the same scenario as Chrome is today's IE6. Dominant.
Reply Retweet Like
Alexander May 3
Didn't even realize that was an option. Thanks for pointing it out for me. Also turns out I had HTTPSEverywhere turned off completely for some reason so glad I got it back on
Reply Retweet Like
Chad Loder ✿ May 3
Props to for reminding me
Reply Retweet Like
suldrew May 3
Replying to @SwiftOnSecurity
“The entire PR team had Macs running Chrome and could not even see what we had done”
Reply Retweet Like
SecDef Arpaio May 3
Replying to @SwiftOnSecurity
Can we do the same for JRE and Flash?
Reply Retweet Like
Tweetledee May 3
btw, Chrome is Google. I use as Google and Facebook have data intrusion problems.
Reply Retweet Like
suldrew May 3
Replying to @SwiftOnSecurity
I’m pretty sure I saw that banner on my Windows device back in 2009
Reply Retweet Like
Tweetledee May 3
Very long article.
Reply Retweet Like
PlaneOnSwift May 3
Replying to @SwiftOnSecurity
Unfortunately, Mozilla Firefox absolutely deserves the same valorization for the changes it has fostered, and their activist use of their TLS ertificate store, but I haven’t written it. Complicating the fact is I was a teen during early years so I didn’t understand technical side
Reply Retweet Like
Tweetledee May 3
And on & on. Will try to read next break, but really old MacBook and Firefox FTW
Reply Retweet Like
Tweetledee May 3
Reply Retweet Like
Ben Bromley May 3
Replying to @SwiftOnSecurity
i don't blame you, since a lot of people were too young to know anything different, but the google chrome hegemony is almost as bad as ie6 was in the day The only benefit chrome has is that its a better browser, but google uses it as a monopoly in the same way MSFT did
Reply Retweet Like